Sanders sounds alarm on GOP budget

MONTPELIER — Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders warned governors in all 50 states Monday of pending cuts headed their way if a GOP spending plan being negotiated this week by House and Senate conferees is approved.

In separate letters to each state, the independent Sanders, ranking member on the Senate Budget Committee, characterized the potential cuts as ‘devastating.” He said they would impact working families, the elderly, the sick, the poor and children.

“It is an embarrassingly disastrous document,” Sanders said of the budget proposal in a telephone interview Monday.

According to Sanders, who is mulling a run for president to promote progressive ideals, Vermont could face dire consequences under the House and Senate budget resolutions that outline federal spending for the next decade. House and Senate conferees were working Monday to reconcile differences between the two chambers and are expected to reach agreement early this week.

Sen. Bernie Sanders

Sen. Bernie Sanders

Among the potential impacts in Vermont that Sanders outlined in his letter to Democratic Gov. Peter Shumlin are:

— 32,000 people could lose health coverage
— 5,000 jobs could be lost as a result of cuts to education, transportation and other programs
— Cuts to Pell grants could lead to higher tuition for 12,000 college students
— Investments for roads and bridges could be reduced by as much as $261 million

The cuts to programs and services that serve the poor “will be devastating for the middle class and working families of our country,” Sanders wrote in his letter.

“At a time of massive income and wealth inequality the Republican budget will make the very rich even richer, while causing increased pain and suffering for the middle class and the most vulnerable people in our state as a result of draconian cuts to important programs,” Sanders wrote.

Similar letters were sent to the other 49 governors outlining potential cuts in their states.

“I will do my best to see that (the budget plan) is defeated and I hope that some of these governors that we have written to will weigh in on this discussion,” Sanders said.

The GOP spending plan looks to “terminate” the Affordable Care Act, commonly known as Obamacare, and cut $40 billion from Medicaid over the next 10 years, according to Sanders. Doing so, he said, would mean a loss of health coverage for millions.

“They’re just going to throw another 27 million people off of health insurance with no plan to address that. None,” the senator said. “That will be a disaster for states who will have to figure out what to do. There is no question that people will die as a result of that.”

The plan that the GOP is finalizing drops a previous proposal to institute a voucher system for Medicare that would provide the elderly with subsidies to purchase private insurance.

Sanders also decried a nearly 100 billion cut to Pell grants for college students, cuts to nutrition programs and the elimination of the estate tax, which he said would provide about $270 billion in relief to the richest 0.2 percent of Americans over the next 10 years.

“It is a budget that is so bad that I think it’s hard for people to believe it’s true, but it is,” Sanders said.

Shumlin released a statement Monday expressing confidence that the state’s congressional delegation will advocate for a budget that serves Vermont well.

“As Senator Sanders outlines, the effects of federal budget decisions on Vermont are real and will have an impact on the services Vermonters rely on,” the governor said. “As we await the final budget from Washington, we do so knowing that we have fighting for us on the Budget Committee one of America’s greatest champions for the middle class in Bernie Sanders. Combined with Senator Patrick Leahy and Congressman Peter Welch, Vermont is well represented in Washington by the best Congressional Delegation in America.”

The budget resolution provides a broad spending plan but does not actually appropriate funds. Its passage would pave the way for spending bills that do appropriate funds to advance.

Sanders said he will look to prevent such spending bills from passing.

“I will certainly do everything I can to urge the president to veto any piece of legislation that comes out that has this framework in it,” he said. “Whether the president vetoes it or not, that’s another story. I certainly hope he will.”

According to Sanders, the impacts he identified are based on an evaluation of House and Senate versions of the budget resolutions by the Office of Management and Budget, the Economic Policy Institute and the Institution of Taxation and Economic Policy. Some data was generated based on projections from the Census Bureau and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.

neal.goswami@timesargus.com

Read Sanders’ letter to Gov. Peter Shumlin below:

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