Dunne sets frenetic fundraising pace for gov hopefuls

MONTPELIER — Democrat Matt Dunne posted an impressive fundraising haul Wednesday of more than $100,000 as he considers a bid for governor.

Dunne, a 45-year-old former state senator from Windsor County, now works as the head of community affairs for Google. He has launched previous, unsuccessful campaigns for both lieutenant governor and governor.

Dunne was part of the five-way Democratic primary for governor in 2010, from which Gov. Peter Shumlin emerged victorious. Another primary is likely in 2016, as House Speaker Shap Smith and Vermont Agency of Transportation Secretary Sue Minter ponder their own bids. But neither filed a July 15 campaign finance disclosure statement required for candidates with who raise or spend more than $500.

Matt Dunne

Matt Dunne

Dunne’s campaign finance disclosure form filed this week shows that his contacts with tech executives helped him take in about $114,500 in contributions for the 2016 election cycle in just the past several weeks. That doesn’t include about $20,000 more than came within the two-day period before Wednesday’s filing deadline, he said.

Reid Hoffman, the co-founder of LinkedIn, along with his wife Michelle Yee, contributed a total of $8,000. Dunne said Hoffman, who attended the Putney School, has connections to the Green Mountain State. Christopher Brousseau, of San Mateo, Calif., who donated $2,000, grew up in Vermont with Dunner and Burlington Mayor Miro Weinburger, according to Dunne.

Married tech tycoons Mark Pincus and Allison Pincus, founders of the Zynga online gaming company and the One King’s Lane retail outlet, respectively, also kicked in $8,000 in contributions.

Support from people “who just aren’t able to live in Vermont is not insignificant,” Dunne said of his many out-of-state contributions.

Closer to home, Dunne’s report showed that he is locking in early support from big-wig Democrats, including Jane and Bill Stetson, who collectively contributed $4,000. Dunne said the Stetsons, who are big Democratic donors, did not support him in 2010. Dealer.com co-founder Mike Lane contributed $3,000.

Perhaps the most impressive distinction about Dunne’s fundraising is that it has only been about two weeks since he began dialing for dollars.

“I’ve made it really clear that we are serious about a potential race for governor. Over the last 10 days we’ve started reaching out to Vermonters to gauge their interest,” he said. “As you can see that response is very positive. People are ready for new ideas and new leadership. The financial support is a great indication of the enthusiasm that’s out there.”

Gov. Peter Shumlin announced in early June that he would not seek a fourth term. But then U.S. Rep. Peter Welch entered the fray, saying he would consider a return to Vermont and a gubernatorial bid. It was only recently that Welch bagged his trial balloon and Dunne returned from a vacation to begin seeking support in earnest.

“This was all part of a process that started after my friend Peter Welch decided that he wanted to stay fighting for Vermont in Washington, D.C.,” Dunne said. “When I got back I started reaching out to Vermonters all over the state to gauge their interest in a different kind of approach to Montpelier and to leadership. The response, as you can see, was really, really positive.”

Despite his early fundraising prowess, Dunne continues to maintain that his mind is not made up on a run. He said most Vermonters are not engaged in politics this far ahead of the election.

“We’ll make that announcement when we feel like we have all the pieces in place and the timing is right,” Dunne said.

Smith, meanwhile, said he has not begun to ask supporters to contribute financially. Although he has been traveling the state gauging support, and even lining up campaign staff, the speaker said Wednesday he has not reached a final decision about his political future.

House Speaker Shap Smith

House Speaker Shap Smith

“I have been deciding whether I’m going to run for governor and I think once I make that decision I’ll raise money from people. I’m not going to do that before then,” Smith said.

The six-term House member from Morrisville said he is not worried about Dunne’s impressive tally.

“It’s July of 2015 and a primary wouldn’t be until August of 2016. That’s more than 12 months. So, the answer to that is no,” Smith said. “We’re talking about more than a year before the primary and 15 months before the general election. There’s more than enough time to raise the money for a primary.”

“My focus really has been on what Vermonters are looking for in 2016, talking to them about whether they would support me if I ran for governor, and most importantly, talking to my family about what it would mean to run for governor,” he added. “I always expected that the people who would be in the race would be able to raise funds.”

Minter, a former House member and Tropical Storm Irene recovery officer, has said she is considering a run for office but appears to be making fewer behind-the-scenes moves than Dunne and Smith.

On the Republican side, Lt. Gov. Phil Scott, who says he is considering a bid for the top job, filed a disclosure report as lieutenant governor. That report shows no new contributions to Scott for the 2016 cycle. Dan Feliciano, who ran in 2014 as a Libertarian and registered 4 percent of the vote last November, reported no financial activity and about $90 to carry over into the 2016 campaign cycle. He has since joined the Republican Party and is said to be considering a second run for governor.

Read Matt Dunne’s report below:

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