Category Archives: Elections

Official tally shows Shumlin wins plurality; Milne has today to challenge

Scott Milne

Scott Milne

MONTPELIER – An official tally shows Gov. Peter Shumlin received 2,434 more votes than Republican challenger Scott Milne during last week’s election.

Wednesday morning, the Canvassing Committee – consisting of representatives from the state Democrat, Liberty Union, progressive and Republican parties – met at the Sec. of State’s Office to sign off on official voter results, which confirmed the unofficial results that have been posted online for the past few days.

Shumlin received 89,509 votes, compared with 87,075 for Milne, which gave Shumlin a 1.3-percent edge over his closest competitor. Libertarian candidate Dan Feliciano finished third in a field of seven with 8,428 votes.

With such a narrow margin, Milne has the right to request a recount, and has until the end of the day to do so.

Neither candidate received more than 50 percent of votes overall – Shumlin received 46.4 percent to Milne’s 45.1 percent – which leaves the final decision in the hands of the Legislature in January.

Unofficial results give Shumlin plurality by 1.26 percent

The Vermont Secretary of State’s office posted unofficial results of Tuesday’s mid-term election Saturday morning showing that Democratic Gov. Peter Shumlin has won a plurality of votes over Republican challenger Scott Milne by a 2,434 vote margin.

The results show an increase of about 300 votes from the tally The Associated Press revealed earlier this week.

The results will not be official until early next week when they are certified by the state’s Canvassing Committee.

According to the Secretary of State’s results, Shumlin received 89,509 votes, while Milne received 87,075 votes. Libertarian Dan Feliciano received 8,428 votes.

Shumlin’s votes account for 46.36 percent of the votes. Milne’s tally represents 45.1 percent of the vote. Because no candidate received 50 percent of the vote, the newly elected Legislature must choose a governor when the new legislative biennium kicks off in January.

Milne is currently considering requesting a recount. He is entitled to a recount, if he wishes, under state law because the margin between the first and second place finishers is less than 2 percent.

Milne is also considering making his case to lawmakers that they should choose him as the next governor based on how their individual legislative districts voted. Milne has said he will announce his plans when the state’s election results are official.

Unofficial results posted Saturday by the Secretary of State's office

Unofficial results posted Saturday by the Secretary of State’s office

Milne not ready to concede

BURLINGTON — Republican gubernatorial candidate Scott Milne canceled a news conference he had planned for Wednesday morning as his race against incumbent Democratic Gov. Peter Shumlin remained tight.

Instead, Milne issued a statement around 10:00 a.m. saying he would wait for the final numbers to be reported before making any further comments.

“What is clear is that the majority of Vermonters do not agree with the path that we are on. We are going to wait for the final numbers,” Milne said. “I am incredibly grateful to all of the Vermonters who cast their ballots on my behalf yesterday. I owe it to my supporters and all Vermonters to see the totals before we make any further statements.”

Scott Milne

Scott Milne

Milne was at the Sheraton Hotel in Burlington Wednesday morning but did not come down to the lobby where the media had assembled for his expected news conference.

Shumlin, a two-term incumbent, maintained a narrow lead over Milne, a Pomfret businessman, throughout Tuesday night and in to Wednesday morning. Milne was trailing Shumlin by about 2,300 votes Wednesday morning with 273 of 275 precincts reporting, according to an Associated Press tally.

Shumlin has 89,687 votes to Milne’s 87,354 votes, according to the AP’s numbers.

Shumlin issued a statement around 11:40 a.m. saying it is “clear” he has the lead.

“We’ve taken a close look at the numbers. While I will await final counts and further statements from Scott Milne, it is clear we are ahead and I’m confident that I’ve received the most votes. Serving as governor has been the greatest privilege of my life and I will be proud to continue leading this great state. I understand how close this election was and I want Vermonters to know that I will be working hard for each and every one of them,” he said.

What looks to be an extremely narrow margin of victory for Shumlin likely scuttles the governor’s dream of implementing a single payer health care system in Vermont, and likely damage any future political ambitions he holds.

Shumlin was unable to pull away to a comfortable margin even with a large boost in Burlington, where Shumlin beat Milne by about 4,000 votes. Voters were clearly discontent with Shumlin, who received far less support than other Democrats running statewide.

Milne, whose campaign spending — $211,000 to Shumlin’s nearly $900,000 — paled in comparison to the governor, entered the race for governor late and was expected to be easily defeated by the governor. But he appeared to be benefiting from discontent with Shumlin and a strong GOP wave that was sweeping across the country.

Gov. Peter Shumlin

Gov. Peter Shumlin

An October poll showed Shumlin’s approval rating nearly underwater with 45 percent approving of his performance as governor and 41 percent disapproving. Shumlin has faced more than a year of bad press as Vermont Health Connect, the state’s online insurance marketplace mandated under the federal Affordable Care Act, continued to struggle and lack core functions.

And a land deal Shumlin made last year with a neighbor with intellectual disabilities appeared to still be resonating with some voters.

Shumlin, throughout the campaign, continued to tout his proposal for a single payer health care plan for the state that he hopes to launch in 2017. He has promised to deliver a financing plan to lawmakers and the public in January, two years after Act 48, the law laying the foundation for his plan, called for it to be revealed.

Voters, however, seemed to be more interested in hearing about property tax relief and plans to reform how the state funds its K-12 public education system.

Libertarian Dan Feliciano, who was embraced by some conservatives who were dissatisfied with Milne, had received 7,989 votes, or about 4.35 percent. Some Republicans had urged Feliciano to drop out of the race to boost Milne’s chances of victory. Feliciano could be seen as spoiling a major upset if Milne cannot close the gap with Shumlin.

Election Day live updates

Barre
3:35 p.m.
With less than four hours before polls close, Republican gubernatorial candidate Scott Milne is making a final push for Washington County voters, but he had to leave his biggest sign behind.

Milne and supporters held signs and waved to motorists in downtown Barre near the “Youth Triumphant” statue, but the campaign’s largest sign remained in the back of a pickup parked on the street nearby.

The sign – measuring approximately 4 feet 6 feet – had been out on the triangle of grass that marks the end of North Main Street until a city official came by and told him he had to remove it, Milne said.

Milne campaigns in Barre Tuesday afternoon. (Josh O'Gorman/staff photo)

Milne campaigns in Barre Tuesday afternoon. (Josh O’Gorman/staff photo)

Milne said the official told him he was allowed to display hand-held signs only. Mayor Thomas Lauzon – who endorsed Gov. Peter Shumlin in October – did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Milne spent Tuesday morning campaigning in Windsor County before coming to the capital area.

“I think the higher the turnout in Washington County, the better it will be for me,” Milne said.
-Josh O’Gorman

Photos by Stefan Hard

Montpelier
3:15 p.m.
Things were running smoothly about lunchtime at the polling place at Montpelier’s City Hall, where City Clerk John Odum said compared to two years ago, a presidential election, when voters were lined up on the stairs all the way through to the back of City Hall, it was orderly and well-paced.

Two years ago, for the Presidential election, the lines were down the stairs, and snaked through the back of City Hall — and a voting machine malfunctioned, complicating things, recalled Odum.

With less traffic coming through, and no mechanical issues to report this year, Odum said things were going extremely smoothly.

There were many early votes cast, said Odum, who said turnout through the morning hours had been “steady, not enormous.”

Montpelier’s City Hall was a busy place – with many candidates campaigning out front of City Hall, candidate signs everywhere around City Hall, even the back door, and many parking meters blocked off, and reserved for voting only.
-Amy Nixon

East Montpelier
2:45 p.m.
Voting was busier on Election Day morning than Town Clerk Terri Conti expected, she said.

“It’s actually busier than I thought it was going to be, it’s been steady and consistent,” she said.

By mid-morning, just a few hours in, about 25 percent of the town’s about 2,000 registered voters had come through the polling place. With people checking in, many busy behind curtains filling out their ballots, and several on their way to drop their ballots in the box, the official polling place was bustling.

Stopping into East Montpelier Elementary School to vote on Tuesday was, for many town residents, the first time they had seen the inside of the recently completed $8 million renovation to the school.

That taxes are due in two weeks, a chance to actually stop into the brightly-patterned school and see the top-to-bottom renovation, even from a quick look coming in the side door to the polling place, gave voters a feel for the renovation project their tax dollars underwrote, noted Conti. She said people were making comments about how nice the school turned out.

“People are very impressed with the new school,” said Conti, noting the due date for taxes is creeping up this month. “It makes it an easier pill to swallow,” she said of the increase in people’s taxes to cover the school renovation bond.

Election Day, Conti said, “Is my favorite day; you get to see everybody,” she said, getting up to hug someone. “I love my job.”
-Amy Nixon

Montpelier
2:15 p.m.
Regardless of the outcome of the election, Ivan Shadis, the youngest of the candidates from Montpelier hoping to land a state representative seat for Washington County 4, said the day for him was “spectacular.”

“It’s a day I’ve really been looking forward to for a long time,” said Shadis, 26, wearing a winter cap and warm flannel shirt, standing with a handmade sign bearing his name in front of Montpelier City Hall.

“It’s particularly rewarding to see my supporters,” smiled Shadis, a city native who ran as a Progressive, challenging incumbents Mary Hooper and Warren Kitzmiller, both also at City Hall mid-day Tuesday.

The back entrance to Montpelier City Hall on Tuesday. (Amy Nixon/staff photo)

The back entrance to Montpelier City Hall on Tuesday. (Amy Nixon/staff photo)

Several of Shadis’s supporters, including some family members at City Hall pulling for him, made him feel valued for the issues he brought to the forefront as a young candidate. Shadis raised issues about housing costs being too high, obstacles in finding decent-paying work, and called for a progressive tax to help improve the picture for those struggling to make ends meet in Vermont.

Of feeling his message was heard, Shadis said, “That itself has made this day spectacular.”

Shadis said he knows a number of people who were “reticent about politics,” at the start of the campaign, who have become impassioned and involved since and that means a lot to him.

“It’s a bit of political culture that I can feel proud to have put some work into,” Shadis said with a smile. He said he plans to stay involved — and be back. “This is our town,” he said of the need for younger voters to be heard.
-Amy Nixon

Barre
1:10 p.m.
Why not me?

One Barre voter, disappointed by the Republican Party’s failure to field a candidate for Secretary of State this year, apparently asked himself that question while filling out his ballot today.

“I wrote myself in,” he said before strolling out of the Barre Municipal Auditorium.
-David Delcore

Barre
1 p.m.
There were a couple of morning lulls, but voting was otherwise steady at the Barre Municipal Auditorium this morning.

At noon 1,097 of the Granite City’s 4,950 voters had cast ballots – a figure that included more than 400 of the 477 early and absentee ballots that were in hand when the polls opened five hours earlier.

With five hours to go and most of the absentee ballots already accounted for, the pace of voting will have to pick up considerably to match the turnout in the last mid-term elections. In 2010 a total of 2,772 Barre voters participated in the November election.
-David Delcore

Barre Town
11:52 a.m.
Finding parking was occasionally challenging for voters and a mid-morning power problem briefly disabled one of the vote tabulating machines, but today’s election otherwise got off to a smooth start in Barre Town.

By 11 a.m. 776 of the town’s 5,492 registered voters had made the trip to Barre Town Elementary and Middle School where school was in session and the parking lot was filled to capacity.

According to Town Clerk Donna Kelty the 776 voters who cast ballots in the first four hours after the polls opened in the school gymnasium did not include 677 early and absentee ballots that had been requested from her office in the weeks leading up to the election. Kelty said two “super huge boxes” of those ballots were being processed.

Kelty said a “power failure” that briefly idled a vote tabulating machine around 9 a.m. Was quickly resolved.
-David Delcore

Barre
9:30 a.m.
Nearly 450 Granite City voters didn’t wait until today to cast their ballots.

When the polls opened at the Barre Municipal Auditorium at 7 a.m. City Clerk Carol Dawes had roughly 400 voted ballots in hand and was waiting for about 50 more to be returned.

Dawes said 447 of the city’s 4,950 registered voters either voted early or requested absentee ballots.vote-button

Still, Dawes described today’s early turnout as “medium-steady.”

In the first 30 minutes 192 voters cast ballots and by 9 a.m. that number had swelled to roughly 275, not counting the absentee ballots that were being fed into the voting machine by poll workers.

-David Delcore

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Milne makes “The Daily Show”

GOP gubernatorial candidate Scott Milne made his debut on “The Daily Show” Wednesday night in host Jon Stewart’s closing “Moment of Zen” clip. It features Milne incorrectly stating where he was born as he introduced himself at a recent debate sponsored by Vermont PBS.

Scott tops $200,000 in contributions

Republican Lt. Gov. Phil Scott reported raising $38,000 during the latest campaign finance reporting period. That brings his total contributions for the campaign to $202,000. He has spent about $150,000 so far.

Read the report below:

Shumlin adds another $100k, spends big on TV ads

Democratic Gov. Peter Shumlin’s Oct. 1 campaign finance report shows he raised more than $100,000 in the past few weeks. Most of his campaign contributions came from larger donors. The report also shows that Shumlin has spent more than $200,000 on television advertisements.

Read the report below:

Poll: Shumlin leads Milne by double digits

Democratic Gov. Peter Shumlin is leading Republican challenger Scott Milne 48 percent to 36 percent, according to a poll released Friday by Rasmussen Reports.

According to Rasmussen, the survey of 700 likely voters in Vermont was conducted Aug. 28 to Aug. 29 by. The margin of sampling error is +/- 4 percentage points with a 95 percent level of confidence. Field work was conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC.

The poll did not include Libertarian candidate Dan Feliciano. Although Milne easily secured the GOP nomination in Tuesday’s primary, Feliciano was able to secure double digit support thanks to an aggressive write-in campaign. He will appear on the general election ballot as the Libertarian nominee.

Shumlin taps Coriell to head campaign

Gov. Peter Shumlin announced Friday that he has tapped Scott Coriell to head his re-election bid, which will have a kick-off event on Tuesday, Sept. 9.

Coriell has served as a special assistant to Shumlin since September 2013, and was previously the communications director for Democratic Rep. Peter Welch. Coriell will leave his position in the governor’s office immediately to begin working on the campaign.

“My campaign will focus on the challenges and opportunities facing our great state in the years ahead,” Shumlin a vacationing Shumlin said in a statement sent out by his campaign finance director. “We have made great progress, but I will not rest until all Vermonters have the economic security and quality of life they deserve. It has been a great honor to serve as Vermont’s governor and I look forward to traveling the state over the coming weeks and asking Vermonters for their support for two more years of progress.”

Details about the kick-off event will be released next week, according to the campaign.

Shumlin, Milne and Sorrell secure nominations

MONTPELIER — Tuesday’s primary was marked by low voter turnout and slow, tedious counting by election officials as they sorted through many ballots with write in votes.

Few Vermonters exercised their right to vote in the state’s primary Tuesday in which candidates looked to secure their party’s nominations for the general election in November. Clerks around the state reported a paltry showing from voters.

Most town and city clerks were expected to be counting and tallying results late into the night, well past deadline, thanks to aggressive write in campaigns waged by Libertarian gubernatorial candidate Dan Feliciano and Dean Corren, a Progressive running for lieutenant governor.

On the GOP ballot, gubernatorial candidate Scott Milne was declared the winner by the Associated Press just after 8 p.m. He defeated Republicans Emily Peyton and Steve Berry, and fended off the write in challenge by Feliciano.

With just 79, or 29 percent of the state’s 275 precincts reporting results at 8:45 p.m., Milne had tallied 70 percent of the vote, far ahead of both Peyton and Berry who both had about 6 percent. Write in votes, presumably most with Feliciano’s name, accounted for 17.5 percent of the reported votes.

Town and city clerks were mandated to report results to the Secretary of State’s office Tuesday night with the number of write in votes cast, but were not required to declare for whom those write in votes were cast.

“I’m very pleased to win. I was not surprised, I guess, but I think the low turnout could have been bad for me. My sense is that if there was a larger turnout my margin would have been higher,” Milne said. “Overall, I thought it was good for Vermont and I think it gives me a little more name recognition going into November, so I’m thankful for my opponents for that.”

Milne will now pivot from the primary to focus on defeating incumbent Democratic Gov. Peter Shumlin, who easily won his party’s nomination Tuesday. Milne said he will make the case that Shumlin has had “a really bad performance over the last four years.”

“We need to present ourselves as a credible alternative to Gov. Shumlin and I think we will do very well in the fall,” he said.

Corren was asking voters to write him in on the Democratic primary ballot to help him secure the nomination for both the Progressive and Democratic Parties. He will need at least 250 write in votes on the Democratic ballot for the party to endorse him. However, some party stalwarts, including Democratic Sens. Dick Mazza, Dick Sears and John Campbell, have endorsed the popular Republican incumbent Phil Scott.

As of 8:45 p.m., 1,245 write in votes had been cast, but it was unclear for whom. Some Democrats had pledged to write in Scott on the Democratic ballot in a bid to thwart Corren.

In the Democratic primary for governor, Shumlin was declared the winner early on by the Associated Press. He was way out ahead of challenger H. Brooke Paige. Shumlin had 76 percent of the vote to Paige’s 17 percent.

Paige was also badly trailing incumbent Attorney General William Sorrell, also declared a winner by the AP, in that position’s primary. Sorrell had 79 percent to Paige’s 20 percent.

The race for the Republican nomination for U.S. representative was too close to call. With 92 precincts reporting, Mark Donka and Donald Russell were separated by one vote and had 34 percent of the vote each. Donald Nolte had tallied 27 percent of the vote.

Turnout, as expected, was extremely low. The percentage of registered voters that cast ballots Tuesday was unknown Tuesday night, but looked like it could be one of the worst showings in recent history.

In Barre Town, by 2:30 p.m. only 227 voters had cast ballots out of a possible 5,464 voters on the checklist, according to Town Clerk Donna Kelty.

“It’s been realy, really, slow here,” Kelty said. “We rarely have great turnout for primary elections In our municipality it was the first day of school so people had other things on their minds.”

In Bennington, both of the town’s House districts featured a contest on the Democratic ballot. In the Bennington 2-2 district, four Democrats were running for two spots on the November ballot. Results were not available as of 8:45 p.m.

Still, not even that contested race with well-known candidates could drive voters to the polls in large numbers.

“It doesn’t look like it’s huge,” Town Clerk Timothy Corcoran said about turnout. “Even with those it’s not real huge.”

Corcoran said a lack of contested statewide races on the Democratic side was a major reason for the lack of interest among voters.

“There’s no real statewide races. Nobody votes in the Republican primary,” he said.

Kelty said the state’s late August primary is a main reason for the low turnout. Moving the primary to earlier in the year would like boost turnout, she said.

“I would agree 100 percent with that. If I could pick and choose I think a good time for a primary would be mid-June,” Kelty said. “That would allow ample time for the secretary of state’s office to prepare ballots for the general election.”

neal.goswami@timesargus.com

Milne launches TV ad

MONTPELIER — Republican gubernatorial candidate Scott Milne has launched his first television commercial as the primary approaches next week.

The ad, which will be running on WPTZ, Fox 44/ABC 22 and WCAX through the primary, features footage from Milne’s campaign kickoff event last month in Barre. Former Republican Gov. James Douglas is prominently featured, calling Milne the next governor of Vermont.

“Internally, I think sort of the campaign family, we’re stoked about it. I think it’s very, very good and I’m appreciative of all the support from Gov. Douglas,” Milne said Tuesday.

The commercial also shows footage of Milne’s mother, former GOP state Rep. Marion Milne, who passed away on Aug. 11.

Milne said his campaign is spending just over $20,000 on the commercial through next Tuesday.

 

Lawmakers launch new PAC

MONTPELIER — A pair of moderate lawmakers — one a Democrat, the other a Republican — have launched a nonpartisan PAC aimed at electing candidates that seek “fiscal responsibility” and “balanced, common-sense public policies.”

Rep. Heidi Scheuermann

Rep. Heidi Scheuermann

Reps. Heidi Scheuermann, R-Stowe, and Paul Ralston, D-Middlebury, who is not seeking reelection, announced the new political action committee, Vision to Action Vermont, on Monday. The duo, who have worked together on the House Commerce and Economic Development Committee for the past four years, say they want to “encourage economic prosperity, greater opportunities for Vermont families and businesses, and individual liberties and responsibility.”

“I am very excited to launch this new endeavor,” Scheuermann, who flirted with a run for governor earlier this year, said in a press release. “For many years, I have advocated strongly for a long-term, comprehensive strategy for economic growth in Vermont, and this organization will help bring that focus to the forefront.”

Ralston said November’s election is key, with lawmakers set to tackle health care, property taxes and “taxes in general” during the next legislative biennium that will have an impact on the state’s small businesses and families.

Rep. Paul Ralston

Rep. Paul Ralston

“We must be sure that those in elected positions address those issues thoughtfully and independently, and with an eye toward the benefits and consequences to our economy,” he said in the release.

The PAC plans to raise money to support, promote and endorse candidates of all parties “who are committed to policies of true economic growth, and show great leadership, strength, and independence, yet do so with compassion and respect.”

Milne admits past health, legal troubles

MONTPELIER — Republican gubernatorial candidate Scott Milne revealed in a statement to reporters Thursday that he was arrested three times in college and suffered a stroke in 2006.

The arrests, two for driving under the influence of alcohol and one for possession marijuana and cocaine, all resulted in convictions. Milne said in a telephone interview Thursday that the cases were “settled as expeditiously as possible without spending money on counsel.”

“I don’t think about them on a daily basis, but my presumption is they are part of the public record,” he said.

In 2006, Milne suffered an ischemic stroke caused by a blood clot in his brain. He said he has made a full recovery, suffers “very little residual effect,” and has been cleared by doctors to campaign and serve as governor.

“Basically, I have a little bit of numbness on one side of my buddy and that really is about it,” Milne said.

He gave credit for his recovery to his daughter who he said sought immediate medical attention when the stroke occurred.

Milne, who has yet to formally launch his campaign, said he wanted the information about his past to be out in the open. He said facts about his past “might be important and relevant” to supporters.

Scott Milne

Scott Milne

“I think we wanted to get it out. If we started to campaign earlier we would have sent it out a lot earlier,” he said. “It was a consideration when I was weighing whether or not to run.”

Milne, in the statement sent to reporters, said “Vermonters have a right to a governor who is upfront and transparent.” He promised transparency about his personal life as well as the “economic challenges and crisis of affordability we face as a state.”

House approves campaign finance measure

MONTPELIER — The Housed passed a campaign finance reform bill Thursday on a bipartisan vote following a conference committee with Senate negotiators.

The legislation sailed through the House on a 124 to 15 roll call vote, but some members are disappointed in the final version of the legislation. The plan will raise some contribution limits.

House and Senate negotiators met out of session over the last several months after failing to reach agreement before the end of the 2013 legislative session. They  signed off on a compromise plan Tuesday, the first day of the 2014 legislative session.

The agreement will allow individuals, corporations and PACs  to contribute twice as much money — from $2,000 to $4,000 — directly to statewide candidates and PACs.

Meanwhile, political parties can now raise $10,000 directly from those same groups, up from $2,000, and up to $60,000 from their national parties.

Candidates for the Legislature will see a decrease in the contributions they can currently receive. Contributions to House candidates will capped at $1,000, while contributions to Senate candidates will be reduced to $1,500.

Political parties will be able to funnel unlimited amounts of money to candidates, however.

Independent and Progressive candidates said that provides an unfair advantage to Democrats and Republicans who can receive unlimited funding from their respective parties.

Some House members addressed the chamber to explain their votes, saying they voted in favor of the bill because it is time for the state to have limits in place.

Rep. Cynthia Browning, a Democrat from Arlington, said she voted against the bill because the contribution limits are too high and more disclosure should be required closer to elections. The bill is “not enough to even be called campaign finance reform,” she said.

The Senate will consider the compromise bill next week.

Christie fundraiser sells out

MONTPELIER — The Vermont GOP’s Welcome Winter Gala featuring New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie has sold out, according to a party official.

Brent Burns, the state GOP’s political director, wrote to supporters Monday with the news. Party officials “have been absolutely overwhelmed by the excitement it has generated among Vermonters across the political spectrum,” he wrote.

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie

The event, set for Dec. 11 at the Champlain Valley Expo in Essex, is being hosted by Lt. Gov. Phil Scott and Stowe Rep. Heidi Scheuermann. Christie, who easily won a second term earlier this month over Democratic challenger Barbara Buono, is likely to headline the Vermont GOP’s most successful event ever, according to Burns

“It has been a long time since we’ve enjoyed this kind of enthusiasm, and we couldn’t be more proud. We have already sold more than 600 seats and this event promises to be the most successful VTGOP event of all time,” he wrote.

No additional tickets can be reserved at this time. But Burns said the party is looking at options to allow more people to attend and is generating a waiting list if additional tickets can be sold.

The Vermont GOP recently reorganized and elected a new party chairman following a public, intra-party spat between party factions. The Christie fundraiser is “just the beginning of the revitalization of the Vermont Republican Party in Vermont,” Burns wrote.