Category Archives: Politics

Sanders to hold campaign kick-off Tuesday in Burlington

MONTPELIER — Sen. Bernie Sanders will hold a formal campaign kick-off event for his presidential bid on Tuesday at Burlington’s Waterfront Park, his campaign announced Wednesday.

Sanders, Vermont’s junior senator in Washington, has already filed to become a candidate, but plans to announce his candidacy along the shore of Lake Champlain in the city where his political career began as mayor in 1981. The independent promises free Ben & Jerry’s ice cream and live music.

Sen. Bernie Sanders

Sen. Bernie Sanders

“My hometown of Burlington and the people of Vermont have a special place in my heart. There is nowhere else in the world where I would hold an event this important,” Sanders said in a statement.

The self-described democratic socialist is sure to provide many of his trademark assaults on the “billionaire class” and the income inequality he says is plaguing America.

“The formal kickoff will set the stage for the campaign to come. I will lay out an ‘Agenda for America’ which addresses the major crises we face and a vision of a government which works for all of our people and not just the billionaire class,” Sanders said.

The even will take place at 5 p.m. along Burlington’s waterfront. It will be moved to Memorial Auditorium in Burlington in the event of rain.

Sanders’ campaign announced he will then travel to New Hampshire, the site of the nation’s first primary, on Wednesday, before heading to Iowa, site of the first presidential caucus, on Thursday.

Tax deal struck, adjournment looming

MONTPELIER — After a week of veiled veto threats and behind-closed-doors meetings, Gov. Peter Shumlin emerged from his ceremonial office Saturday afternoon with legislative leaders to announced a tax deal — the linchpin paving the way for adjournment.

“I’m really pleased to announce that we’ve reached a deal on the budget that allows us to balance the budget and raise the revenue for the budget in a way that’s not only fiscally responsible but ensures that we can continue to grow this economy for every single Vermont,” Shumlin said, with House Speaker Shap Smith and Senate President Pro Tem John Campbell on either side of him.

unnamedDetails of the $30 million in new taxes raised to balance the 2016 fiscal year budget were to be released later Saturday.

“Everyone has given a little. I think it’s an incredibly sensible plan and most importantly we’re meeting our commitment that we all pledged to keep in this building in January of closing a budget gap by making smart choices for Vermonters and ensuring that our budget is sustainable going forward,” the governor said.

Lawmakers strike tax deal without gov’s approval

MONTPELIER — House and Senate negotiators were nearing a deal on a $30 million revenue package early Saturday morning that will help balance the 2016 fiscal year budget and close a projected $113 million gap — but includes provisions Gov. Peter Shumlin has said he does not support.

The bulk of the new revenue comes from changes to the income tax code. Both the House and Senate have agreed with the governor to raise $15 million by eliminating taxpayers’ ability to deduct their prior year local and state taxes on their state returns.

Senate Finance Committee Chairman Tim Ashe, D/P-Chittenden, briefs reporters late Friday night on a tax plan. (Photo by Erin Sigrist)

Senate Finance Committee Chairman Tim Ashe, D/P-Chittenden, briefs reporters late Friday night on a tax plan. (Photo by Erin Sigrist)

But the House and Senate are also looking to raise about $10.5 million by making changes to how much taxpayers can deduct. Under the plan lawmakers were nearing agreement on, income tax deductions would be capped at two times the standard deduction — about $25,000 for a couple. The plan exempts charitable donations and deductions for catastrophic health care costs, however.

In total, lawmakers are looking to raise $26 million in new income taxes with the changes.

Shumlin has spent much of the week restating his opposition to lawmakers’ plans to limit deductions. He made that case again to the Vermont Press Bureau in an interview Friday morning.

“The reason states don’t tend to cap these deductions … is because they all provide an important role in ensuring you have a strong economy and a strong state and an economy that works for every single member of that state,” Shumlin told the Vermont Press Bureau in an interview. “Among the tax choices that are going to be made, let’s not make illogical choices.”

Senate President Pro Tem John Campbell, D-Windsor, has said Shumlin has threatened to veto the revenue bill because of his opposition to deduction limits.

But that didn’t stop lawmakers from forging ahead.

Senate Finance Committee Chairman Tim Ashe, D/P-Chittenden, said he worked with the House to complete a revenue plan both chambers could agree on.

“The governor’s made no hesitation to say that he would prefer that the only income tax that’s raised be the $15 million that he raised,” Ashe said. “We arrived at what we thought was a fair way to raise the money and that we could reach agreement with the House.”

House Ways and Means Committee Chairwoman Janet Ancel, D-Calais, echoed Ashe’s comments, saying the revenue plan is one that both sides have agreed to.

“We’re trying to get a revenue bill and trying to get out of here,” Ancel said.

House Speaker Shap Smith, D-Morrisville, acknowledged the tax deal was arrived at without the governor’s approval.

“That is true, yes,” the speaker said.

But the plan addresses many of the concerns Shumlin has raised, according to Smith.

“We’ve responded to a number of the concerns that the governor expressed, particularly around the health care and the charitable deduction. We tried to address that. So, my hope is that in addressing those things we can move closer together. I’m eternally optimistic, but perhaps it is unwarranted in this instance,” he said.

The deduction cap included in the deal is fair, Smith said.

“You’re going to get a $25,000 cap on your itemized deductions. That’s a significant amount of allowable deductions, including, on top of that, charitable deductions and for medical. It seems to me pretty reasonable,” he said.

Lawmakers planned to complete the deal early Saturday morning and return later in the day to have both chambers vote on it. Smith declined to comment on how lawmakers would address a potential veto by Shumlin.

“We’ll take it one step at a time,” Smith said.

Scott Coriell, spokesman for Shumlin, left the State House around 11:30 p.m. Friday and said the administration was reviewing the proposal and would have no comment until later on Saturday.

House Appropriations Committee Chairwoman Mitzi Johnson, D-South Hero, left, and Senate Appropriations Committee Chairwoman Jane Kitchel, D-Caledonia, speak during budget negotiations Friday.

House Appropriations Committee Chairwoman Mitzi Johnson, D-South Hero, left, and Senate Appropriations Committee Chairwoman Jane Kitchel, D-Caledonia, speak during budget negotiations Friday.

The revenue plan also includes extending the state’s 6 percent sales tax to soft drinks, which will raise $5.1 million, extending the 9 percent rooms and meals tax to vending machine purchases, and includes a 3 percent minimum tax on taxpayers earning at least $150,000.

“That’s more of a floor payment on people with larger incomes,” he said.

The House and Senate had also agreed in principal to the budget and were expected to sign off on it early Saturday morning.

Capitol Beat with the Governor 5-15-15

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Gov. Peter Shumlin and Vermont Press Bureau chief Neal Goswami chat about the end of the session and the bills that are still in play.

Gov. Peter Shumlin on the Capitol Beat podcast Friday, May 15, 2015.

Gov. Peter Shumlin on the Capitol Beat podcast Friday, May 15, 2015.

House GOP will support veto of tax bill

MONTPELIER — House Republicans voted in caucus Thursday afternoon to help sustain a veto of a revenue bill — if Gov. Peter Shumlin elects to veto the legislation — as House and Senate negotiators look to finalize how they will raise money to support the state budget.

GOP Leader Don Turner, of Milton, asked his caucus to take a position Thursday as negotiators continued to work.

“It’s my feeling that if the governor is going to step up and help us … then I think that’s a good thing,” Turner said.

Shumlin is opposed to how lawmakers have chosen to raise revenue. The House plan caps income tax deductions at 2.5 times the standard deduction. The Senate plan caps mortgage interest deductions and limits charitable contribution deductions to in-state charities.

Shumlin gathered a group of nonprofit leaders on the steps of the State House Wednesday to decry any tinkering with charitable contributions, saying it would cause less giving by Vermonters.

The House GOP caucus voted unanimously to support sustaining a veto after discussing potential pitfalls.

“Is this going to raise his political capital?” asked one member.

“I believe that the governor is doing what our constituents have asked us to do. If that’s the case, why wouldn’t we support it?” Turner countered.

Rep. Kurt Wright of Burlington cautioned the caucus to remember that Shumlin’s original budget proposal raised significantly more in new revenue than the plans passed by both chambers.

“The only thing to keep in mind — the governor didn’t like this tax package, but remember what he started with?” Wright said. “How do you know he doesn’t make a deal with the other side. … He had a larger tax increase on the table to start with.”

In the end, it was an enthusiastic vote in favor of helping Shumlin.

“We all campaigned last year. We all heard the same thing. Everybody in this building heard the same thing. People want their taxes under control. Therefore, if the governor is coming that way I’m more than willing to help him and us do what people asked us to do,” said Rep. Francis “Topper” McFaun, R-Barre Town.

Capitol Beat 5-11-15

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Barre-Montpelier Times Argus Editor Steve Pappas and Vermont Press Bureau chief Neal Goswami discuss the sexual assault case against Sen. Norm McAllister, R-Franklin, the last week of the session and Bernie Sanders.

Capitol Beat with the Governor 5-8-15

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Gov. Peter Shumlin discusses  end-of-session issues that remain unresolved, the possibility that lawmakers will vote to remove the state’s philosophical vaccine exemption and the arrest of Franklin County Sen. Norm McAllister on sex charges.

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RFK Jr. and Vermont moms make their cases on vaccines

MONTPELIER — A prominent member of the country’s most storied political family testified against the elimination of the state’s philosophical exemption for vaccines Tuesday, accusing the Centers for Disease Control of corruption as he made his case to lawmakers.

Robert F. Kennedy Jr., the son of the slain former U.S. senator, attorney general and presidential candidate, told members of the House Health Care Committee that he supports vaccination. But he said some vaccines that contain thimerosal, a mercury-containing compound in some vaccines, can cause harm in children.

The CDC, Kennedy said, which determines which vaccines children should receive, has not done a proper job of protecting them and has bowed to pressure from pharmaceutical companies. He said the trillion dollar industry spends twice as much on lobbying as any other industry.

“I’m pro-vaccine. I’ve had all six of my kids vaccinated,” Kennedy told the panel. “I think we ought to have state and federal policies that maximize vaccine coverage of the population but I think we have to begin the process by making sure the vaccines are safe, efficacious and that the regulatory agency which recommends vaccines … and monitors them has integrity and credibility and, unfortunately, that is not the case at the moment.”

Robert F. Kennedy Jr. at the Vermont State House on Tuesday, May 5, 2015.

Robert F. Kennedy Jr. at the Vermont State House on Tuesday, May 5, 2015.

Kennedy, who received a raucous standing ovation from some people after completing his testimony, has been an environmental activist for three decades and has worked on the vaccine issue for the past 10 years. He spent most of his 15 minutes before the committee denouncing the CDC’s oversight of vaccines.

“CDC is a troubled agency. There’s been four separate, scathing federal studies about CDC,” he said. “All of them together and separately paint a picture of an agency that has become a cesspool of corruption.”

Kennedy accused the agency of manipulating studies to show that vaccines are more effective than they are, and that they do not cause harm.

“You could design an epidemiological study that shows that cigarettes don’t cause cancer or sex didn’t cause pregnancy. You just get rid of all the pregnant people or you get rid of all the people who have cancer and then you present your study,” he said. “That’s what CDC has been doing with these nine epidemiological studies that they point to.”

He also faulted Congress for creating a “shield” for pharmaceutical companies in 1989 “that suddenly made vaccines very profitable,” causing an increase in the number of recommended vaccines by the CDC.

“When I was a kid the vaccines were not profitable. They were not profit centers for the company. They were almost a civic duty. But now vaccines can add revenue of a billion dollars a year for some of these companies and there is tremendous pressure to add these vaccines to the schedule,” he said. “Most of the people who sit on those committees are vaccine industry insiders. Many of them, if not most of them, have direct financial stakes in the outcome of their decision to add the vaccine to the schedule.”

Robert F. Kennedy Jr. speaks to reporters at the Vermont State House.

Robert F. Kennedy Jr. speaks to reporters at the Vermont State House.

“What’s very difficult is for the people of our country or the parents of Vermont to believe that those decisions are being made exclusively with the health of their children in mind,” Kennedy added.

Kennedy said the philosophical exemption in Vermont and other states is important because other protections and avenues of recourse no longer exist.

“The Congress has taken away jurisdiction in federal and state courts of any case against the vaccine industry so nobody can sue them. There’s no discovery, no depositions, there’s no class actions, there’s no documents,” he said. “All those things that protect us are gone. The only thing left that protects that child from that company, the only barrier standing, is the parent. And now we want tot make the parent away.”

Kennedy told reporters after his testimony that parents should vaccinate their children with mercury-free vaccines.

In Vermont, six vaccines are required for children to attend school, including ones for polio, Hepatitis B, measles and pertussis, according to Christine Finley, the Vermont Department of Health’s Immunization Program chief.

Currently, all 50 states allow medical exemptions. All but two states allow religious exemptions and 19 states have philosophical exemptions. Only Mississippi and West Virginia have neither religious nor philosophical exemptions.

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Vaccine debate heats up with a star witness

MONTPELIER — Action in the House on a bill that seeks to remove the state’s philosophical exemption for vaccines will be delayed until next week while a House Committee takes testimony on the issue.

Dylan Giambatista, chief of staff for Democratic House Speaker Shap Smith, said the House Health Care Committee will take testimony on Tuesday and Wednesday, and possibly Thursday. Currently, the committee is scheduled to hear from state health officials, medical professionals and advocates on both sides of the vaccine issue.

One of those advocates will be Robert F. Kennedy Jr., the son of former presidential candidate, U.S. attorney general and New York. Sen. Bobby Kennedy. Kennedy, who has testified around the country against forced vaccination, is scheduled to meet with Gov. Peter Shumlin Tuesday before providing testimony to the Health Care Committee, according to Kevin Ellis, a Montpelier-based lobbyist working to retain the state’s philosophical exemption.

Robert F. Kennedy Jr.

Robert F. Kennedy Jr.

Kennedy’s views and comments about vaccinations have been somewhat controversial. Last month he compared vaccination to a holocaust. And he has linked vaccinations with autism. The Journal of the American Medical Society has stated there is “no harmful association” between the measles, mumps and rubella vaccine and autism.

Shumlin spokesman Scott Coriell said Monday that Shumlin was asked to meet with Kennedy Tuesday and was told the governor “would probably have time in the afternoon to meet for a few minutes.” That meeting will not be open to the public, according to Coriell, and will not impact Shumlin’s views.

“The only voices that matter to the governor on this debate and any other are those of Vermonters,” he wrote in an email.

Ellis said he does not expect Kennedy’s recent comment to detract from his testimony.

“He’s been right on everything that matters,” Ellis said. “I think he apologized. We all make mistakes in the passion of the moment. He’s an important voice in the debate and it’s a debate that we need to have.”

Advocates in favor of removing the state’s philosophical exemption are also slated to be at the State House Tuesday. A group of Vermont mothers and grandmothers are holding a news conference Tuesday afternoon.

Passionate debate over the issue of vaccine exemptions was reignited earlier this year when Sen. Kevin Mullin, R-Rutland, introduced a bill to remove the right of parents to decline vaccinations for their children for philosophical reasons. It would also prevent students who are not vaccinated from attending school. A medical exemption and a religious exemption would remain.

That bill did not move, but Mullin and others were able to attach legislative language to another bill dealing with a disease registry. The bill, which included removing the philosophical exemption, passed the Senate on an 18 to 11 vote.

Sen. Kevin Mullin

Sen. Kevin Mullin

The bill as amended by the Senate has since languished in the House for nearly two weeks. The House postponed action on it until May 6, but that will now be pushed back further, Giambatista said, to what is expected to be the final week of this legislative session.

“I don’t think it’s going to be this week. It would be next week at the earliest, so it’s going to be down to the wire on the clock,” he said. “We’re trying to do our due diligence and have our opportunity for discussion.”

The Senate passed a similar repeal of the philosophical exemption in 2012, only to see it squashed by the House. Smith, whose wife is a physician, supports repealing the exemption, but it remains unclear if there is enough support in the House to advance it.

“He shares that with both sides on the issue. He is very clear on this issue,” Giambatista said. “The conversation is going to be ongoing.”

The speaker has met with both proponents and opponents of removing the exemption. Both sides will have a chance to testify before the House Health Care Committee this week.

“In terms of support levels, I don’t know. It’s a difficult issue to call because both sides are well-organized,” Giambatista.

Shumlin has been a supporter of keeping the exemption in place, but has indicated a willingness in recent weeks to entertain the debate. Coriell said Monday that Shumlin wants to give the law he signed in 2012 time to work.

That law requires parents or guardians to sign a form from the Heath Department acknowledging they have “reviewed and understands evidence-based educational material provided by the department of health regarding immunizations, including information about the risks of adverse reactions to immunization.”

The law also allows students to remain in school without required vaccines for up to six months if they are in the process of receiving them.

“The governor supports the law he signed two years ago and thinks we should give it a chance to work. If the Legislature wants to debate this issue further, he is open to that debate,” Coriell said.

neal.goswami@timesargus.com

Sanders makes his case on ‘This Week’

Sen. Bernie Sanders made his first appearance on a Sunday morning talk this past weekend as a declared presidential candidate. Vermont’s independent junior senator defended his brand of democratic socialism to ABC’s This Week host George Stephanopoulos. Watch his full appearance below.


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Sanders donors respond to campaign announcement

WASHINGTON (AP) — Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders says he has raised $1.5 million online in the first day since launching his Democratic presidential campaign.

The independent senator says he has received contributions from 35,000 donors, and more than 100,000 people have signed up on his website.

Sanders filed papers to run for president on Thursday, becoming the first major challenger to enter the race against Hillary Rodham Clinton. She opened her campaign earlier this month.

Clinton is heavily favored but Sanders has positioned himself as a liberal who intends to promote economic and environmental issues and oppose contentious trade legislation.

Sanders plans to make stops Saturday in New Hampshire, the home of the nation’s first presidential primary. It will be his 10th trip to New Hampshire in the past year.

Shumlin signs new gun law

MONTPELIER — Gov. Peter Shumlin privately signed new gun legislation Friday afternoon without any fanfare and announced the move in a statement.

The new law, which passed the Legislature as S.141, creates a new misdemeanor state-level crime for possession of firearms by people with certain criminal convictions. The law also requires the reporting of names to a federal database when people are found by a court to be in need of mental health treatment and a danger to themselves or others.

Shumlin had spent much of this legislative session resisting and new gun laws, saying Vermont’s current laws were sufficient. But a controversial element — expanded background laws for all gun sales — was stripped from an earlier version of the legislation. That was enough to secure his signature.

“Vermonters know that I feel that Vermont’s gun laws make sense for our state. We in Vermont have a culture of using guns to care for and manage our natural resources in a respectful way that has served us well,” the governor said in a statement. “The bill delivered to me today is a shadow of the legislation that I objected to at the beginning of the legislative session. It makes common sense changes, similar to the ones that I supported to prohibit guns on school grounds, and that is why I signed it.”

Gun rights groups that initially opposed the bill, including the Vermont Federation of Sportsmens Clubs, dropped their objections after the legislation was scaled back.

Just hours earlier on Friday, Shumlin told the Vermont Press Bureau in an interview that his office had not yet received the bill and he had not thought about whether there would be a public signing ceremony. He declared his intention to sign the bill in an interview with the Vermont Press Bureau a week ago.

Shumlin’s office received the bill around 11 a.m. along with three other pieces of legislation awaiting the governor’s signature, according to staff. The office then sought out Rep. Sam Young, D-Glover, to be present for the signing because of the passionate speech he delivered on the House floor in favor of the bill.

Senate President Pro Tem John Campbell, D-Windsor, an original sponsor of the legislation, nor any of the other original Senate sponsors, were present. Campbell said Friday he was disappointed in the way Shumlin treated the signing.

“I am very, very disappointed on behalf of myself and the other senators who worked very hard to pass that bill that he didn’t have the common decency to alert us that he was going to sign that bill, No. 1, and, No. 2, that he didn’t invite anyone from the Senate to be there,” Campbell said.

Shumlin defends late budget push

MONTPELIER — Gov. Peter Shumlin said Friday he is asking lawmakers to cut an additional $10 million from the budget because they have rejected his proposal to institute a payroll tax to help pay for Medicaid costs.

Shumlin summoned the chairs of Senate money committees Wednesday — one day before the Senate took up the annual budget bill — to tell them they needed to cut more and tax less. The move frustrated lawmakers who are grinding toward adjournment, which is to come in mid-May.

On Thursday, administration officials presented a list of $8 million in further cuts to the Senate Appropriations Committee and made clear the third-term Democrat did not favor their tax plans.

Gov. Peter Shumlin speaks at a recent State House news conference.

Gov. Peter Shumlin speaks at a recent State House news conference.

“I really feel strongly that the tax packages being contemplated in this building will hurt our economy and hurt Vermonters,” Shumlin said in an interview with the Vermont Press Bureau on Friday. “I believe that the current budget framework needs to cut more and tax less.”

At the heart of the matter, Shumlin said, is how lawmakers have chosen to fund Medicaid case loads, which expanded under the federal Affordable Care Act to the tune of $16 million. The governor’s budget proposal used a 0.7 percent payroll tax on Vermont businesses to raise $90 million to cover that cost as well as to boost payments to Medicaid providers.

Lawmakers have rejected that, however, and funded Medicaid case loads through various taxes. But Shumlin, while now acknowledging his plan is unlikely, wants lawmakers to cut deeper rather than raise taxes.

“That idea has been an uphill slog and it looks like it’s possible that it may not come to fruition,” he said. “Unless they suddenly … see the light, which doesn’t seem extraordinarily likely, but I’m still hopeful, we have a $16 million budget challenge that we didn’t have, that we had taken care of.”

Shumlin said his proposal created an ongoing, dedicated source for Medicaid. Lawmakers, meanwhile, have created a host of new taxes to balance the general fund, he said.

“They want to take away your home mortgage deduction because you bought a home, they want to take away your charitable deduction because you want to support charities in your community, they want to take away the catastrophic health care deduction,” he said. “They want to tax soda and everything else with sugar in it because they say that drinking that stuff isn’t healthy for you, which it probably isn’t, but they also want to tax water. Tax water? Really? I thought you just said you shouldn’t drink sugary things, now they’re saying we’re going to tax water.”

Lawmakers are not amused with the governor’s late push to adjust their work. House Majority Leader Sarah Copeland Hanzas, D-Bradford, noted that lawmakers used the same amount of new revenue to support the general fund as Shumlin did in his proposal, but their challenge was even greater since the state saw an additional $18 million revenue downgrade after his budget address.

“We closed the $113 million budget gap with the same $35 million that the governor closed his $94 million gap. The same amount, not the same kind of revenue. So, to have the governor suggest that we are spending too much and raising too much in taxes is really perplexing,” she said. “I don’t know where they’re doing their math, but $35 million is $35 million.”

Rep. Sarah Copeland Hanzas

Rep. Sarah Copeland Hanzas

Hanzas said the governor should have made his pitch earlier — before the House passed its budget and sent it to the Senate.

“Where were you on Jan. 20 because it’s three months later and we’ve been through the painful process of vetting all of our painful priorities,” she said. “We would have appreciated them in January, not so much now.”

House Appropriations Committee Chairwoman Rep. Mitzi Johnson, D-South Hero, echoed that sentiment.

“It’s frustrating that he’s had opportunities for the last three months to weigh in on the budget and we don’t have a balanced budget proposal from him. He’s choosing to sort of nit-pick at different things,” Johnson said.

Both Johnson and House Speaker Shap Smith said Friday that the House-passed budget does fully fund the Medicaid case loads, but does not do it the way Shumlin sought.

Shumlin dismissed criticism of his timing, saying previous governors have also pushed for priorities late in the process.

“I don’t know where they’ve been. I’ve served under [Former Gov. Howard] Dean, [former Gov. Jim] Douglas, and I cannot remember as a legislative leader right before we’ve passed the budget not having the governor sit down with us and explain their concerns about budget and taxes. That’s what governors do. So, I understand it’s a time of year where folks get emotional,” Shumlin said.

Late-season requests are part of the budget process, Shumlin said.

“Folks get frustrated this time of year, I understand that, and I’m sympathetic to it. I’ve been on both sides of it in the governor’s office and the legislative leadership end of it,” he said. “The only thing I want to point out is this is not unusual and we shouldn’t be fearing frustration we should be fearing raising taxes on Vermonters at a time when they’re having a difficult time paying their bills, and we should be fearing passing a budget that isn’t sustainable for the years going forward.”

“I believe that my judgement is correct. We should cut $10 million more from the budget and not raise taxes on Vermonters by that $10 million,” Shumlin added.

The Senate appeared ready Friday to reject most of the $8 million in cuts the governor proposed this week. A $1.3 million savings pharmacy costs looked likely, but bigger ticket items, including an additional $2.8 million in labor savings on top of the $10.8 million Shumlin previously requested, appeared to lack support.

neal.goswami@timesargus.com

Capitol Beat with the Governor 5-1-15

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Gov. Peter Shumlin chats with Vermont Press Bureau chief Neal Goswami about his budget disagreements with lawmakers.

Shumlin steps into Senate budget process

MONTPELIER — The Shumlin administration is pushing back against the Senate’s budget plan as the chamber prepares to take it up on the floor Thursday.

“Less spending and fewer taxes,” Gov. Peter Shumlin said Thursday morning.

Administration officials were preparing to meet with the Senate Appropriations Committee Thursday morning to discuss further cuts and ease back some of the tax increases included in the Senate’s budget and tax bills.

“There’s not a set number for anything,” Secretary of Administration Justin Johnson said. “This is not an uncommon conversation for the end of the legislative session.”

A House-passed budget bill closes a $113 million projected gap in the 2016 fiscal year budget. It uses $53 million in spending cuts, $35 million in new revenue and about $25 million in one-time funds to balance the budget.

The Senate version balances the budget in a similar way.

But Shumlin is not pleased with the direction lawmakers have chosen.

“He’s not loving all the revenue. We think that in order to keep taxes down — tax increases down — we have to have a budget that’s as efficient as possible,” Johnson said. “We know that our growth is forecast over the next few years to be around 3 (percent) and the expenditures have been around 5 (percent). We’d like to get them under 5. It’s not a problem you’re going to solve all at once but one that we can solve over time

Johnson said the administration’s late-stage interest in negotiating different terms in the budget and tax bills is not out of the ordinary.

“It’s just sort of putting some pressure back on to make sure we do the best we can,” he said.