Tag Archives: Matt Dunne

Potential candidates for governor abound

MONTPELIER — Gov. Peter Shumlin’s surprise announcement Monday that he will not seek re-election throws the 2016 gubernatorial election wide open — and several candidates on both sides of the aisle say they are interested.

A potential surprise candidate emerged Monday when former Shumlin Chief of Staff Bill Lofy told the National Journal that Democratic Congressman Peter Welch “would be the prohibitive favorite” if he were to jump into the race. Welch has served as Vermont’s lone representative in the House since 2006, and has handily won re-election every two years.

Rep. Peter Welch

Rep. Peter Welch

Welch Chief of Staff Bob Rogan said Monday that Welch will consider his options and has not ruled out a run for governor.

“It’s likely Congressman Welch will seek re-election to Congress but this news comes as a surprise so he will be taking the time he needs to thoughtfully consider how he can best serve Vermonters,” Rogan said.

Democratic House Speaker Shap Smith made clear after the legislative session ended last month that he wants to be governor. But Smith said at the time that he did not want to run in a primary against Shumlin.

“I was pretty clear that I was not running … a primary against the governor. I was also pretty clear that I was interested in running for statewide office. So, it does change the dynamic,” Smith told reporters Monday.

Smith said he and Shumlin have worked together for years “for years trying to make sure that the state of Vermont could be an even better place than it is now and I think that we all owe a debt to Peter for his great work as governor.” He credited Shumlin for his response to the devastating impact Tropical Storm Irene had on Vermont.

Smith said he will consult with many people before deciding if he will launch a campaign for governor.

House Speaker Shap Smith

House Speaker Shap Smith

“I need to spend some time talking with my family first and foremost. This would be a really major decision for our family life. I acknowledge that and I want to make sure that they’re on board with it. I also want to talk to friends and Vermonters to see whether they think it’s a good idea for me to run for governor,” Smith said.

As someone who has never appeared on a statewide ballot, Smith could face a challenge with name recognition.

“I think that we all think that we’re better known than we are. I do find myself on occasion in other parts of Vermont where people say, ‘You’re that speaker guy, right?’” he said. “I don’t think any of us should overestimate how many people know us.”

Meanwhile, former state senator and current Google executive Matt Dunne, has made clear that he’s also itching to return to the Vermont political scene as governor. Dunne, who was part of the five-way Democratic primary in 2010 that Shumlin eventually won, said he plans to consult with his wife, Sarah, as well as his past supporters, before making a decision.

“As I shared with people during the campaign five years ago and more recently, there’s no better job in the world than to represent the people of the state of Vermont and to be able to have a role in helping to move the state forward,” he said. “I will absolutely be considering a run for governor. I’ve been flattered by the large number of phone calls and text messages and Facebook messages and emails I’ve received this afternoon and will take time to talk things over with Sarah and a number of people across the state of Vermont before making a decision.”

Dunne, who is the head of community affairs for Google, said he is not setting any time frame for announcing his decision.

Matt Dunne

Matt Dunne

“I’m not going to set a hard date. It’s going to depend on making the time to have that conversation with Sarah and my kids, who are old enough to be aware of what a campaign means this time, as well as touch base with folks who have supported me in the past and others who have just reach out to me today,” he said.

Doug Racine, a former lieutenant governor and candidate in the 2010 Democratic primary, could also consider a bid. He was fired as secretary of the Agency of Human Services last year by Shumlin.

A number of Republicans have been considering a run — even against Shumlin if he were to run again. But Monday’s announcement by the governor may make the prospect of running even more appealing.

At the head of the pack is Lt. Gov. Phil Scott, a Republican and a member of Shumlin’s cabinet, who said last week he is considering a run for governor. Scott, known for being an affable politician but one who has not yet had to take strong policy stands as lieutenant governor, said he intends to decide his political future over the next several weeks. Monday’s announcement, he said, will not impact that decision.

Lt. Gov. Phil Scott

Lt. Gov. Phil Scott

“Certainly it was a bit of a surprise, coming today, but as I’ve said consistently, whether the governor decided to run or not run will have no bearing on my decision making,” Scott said. “I’ll contemplate this over the next few weeks.”

Scott said he wants to be governor if the situation is right.

“Sure. I think that given the right circumstances, if I think that I’m the right person to lead Vermont and can help in some way, and my family and business will survive this, then I want to be governor,” he said. “It has to be more than about you. It has to be about others and the whole of Vermont.”

The lieutenant governor was not at Monday’s announcement and said Shumlin did not tell him before making the public announcement.

“I understand. Politics is what it is. I’m not surprised. This obviously had to be a tough decision to make and he wanted to share it with those closest to him,” Scott said.

Former State Auditor and Sen. Randy Brock, who was soundly beaten by Shumlin in 2012, says he may also seek the governorship.

Randy Brock

Randy Brock

“I’m certainly considering running again and been talking with people over the past several weeks and have some more to do. It’s something I’m considering but no decision has been made. It’s a decision that will be made over the summer,” he said.

Brock said any potential candidate “needs to declare relatively early because there’s a lot of work to be done, not the least of which is significant fundraising challenges.” Shumlin’s announcement, Brock said, will not sway him in either direction.

“It was always a possibility, and probably a real one after the 2014 election, that Gov. Shumlin would not run again,” he said.

Scott Milne, meanwhile, who lost a razor-thin election to Shumlin in November, said he has not yet determined if he will again seek the office. He said be believes “t’s a good move by Peter to step aside.”

“I believe Vermonters are more aware now than at any time this decade just how bad things are, and how much needs to change in order to save Vermont,” he said. “Whether as a candidate, or as a citizen helping good people get elected in 2016, I am looking forward to the campaign trail again.”

Now that the race for governor features no incumbent, more candidates could explore the idea of entering the race.

Shumlin said during his afternoon announcement that he will work to support the Democratic nominee in 2016.

“I’m going fight to ensure that whoever takes my place as governor is a Democrat with the values and priorities to build upon, rather than undermine, the extraordinary progress we have made,” he said.

neal.goswami@timesargus.com

Shumlin says he will not seek re-election in 2016

MONTPELIER — Gov. Peter Shumlin announced Monday afternoon that he will not seek reelection, and will instead return to his hometown of Putney to resume his role in his student travel business.

The announcement was made at the State House Monday, shortly after he informed his staff and cabinet members of his decision. Many of his current and past staff stood behind him as he told reporters of his plans.

“I am announcing today that I will not be a candidate for a fourth term in 2016,” Shumlin said, after listing what he considers the successes of his tenure as the state’s chief executive.

Gov. Peter Shumlin, with current and former staff behind him, announces Monday that he will not seek re-election in 2016.

Gov. Peter Shumlin, with current and former staff behind him, announces Monday that he will not seek re-election in 2016.

“I reached this decision after a lot of thought and consideration. It is the honor of my life to serve as Vermont’s governor. I want to serve in this role until I feel confident that we have accomplished what we promised to do. By January of 2017, I believe we will have done just that. We’re making tough decisions, we’re taking some risks, and we’re getting a lot of good done for the state of Vermont,” he said. “I decided to make this decision now because I want these next 18 months in office to be focused entirely on continuing the work we started together. And we have a lot left to do.”

The announcement follows a tough re-election fight in November, in which Shumlin received a slim-plurality of the vote against Republican political neophyte Scott Milne. Because Shumlin did not receive a majority of the vote, lawmakers had to formally elect him on the first day of the legislative session in January.

Shumlin said he intends to end his political career when his term expires, and “will not be going to Washington.”

“I have always thought that the right time for a governor to serve is six years. It’s just always the way I have looked at it. I thought that as my third term was evolving, as often happens in life, my perspective might change. It never did,” he said. “I have never wanted to be a full-time politician. I know I’ve told you this before and it’s been greeted with eyes of disbelief, but I’ve never had any desire to live in Washington, D.C., to serve in Congress, to serve in anybody’s cabinet. I truly ran for governor because I wanted to make changes to the state that has given me so much, and then go back to private life.”

Shumlin noted Monday that his administration has boosted the state’s infrastructure, cutting the number of structurally deficient bridges in half. He said his administration has slowed the growth in hospital budgets, and reduced the number of uninsured Vermonters by half. And he has begun to move Vermont away from the current fee-for-service payment model to one that pays health care providers based on health outcomes.

Additionally, Shumlin said his administration has helped the state’s most vulnerable by increasing the minimum wage, and providing more free meals at school to students in need. And, Shumlin said, his administration has altered the way the state deals with its opiate addiction problem.

Gov. Peter Shumlin returns to his ceremonial office in the State House after announcing that he will not seek re-election in 2016.

Gov. Peter Shumlin returns to his ceremonial office in the State House after announcing that he will not seek re-election in 2016.

“When I took office, we politely averted our eyes to opiate addiction in our front yards while we feared and fought treatment centers in our backyards. Today Vermont is one of the most innovative states in treating opiate addiction as the disease it is, saving lives and giving hope, jobs, and a future to those who are suffering while reducing incarceration rates and making our state safer,” Shumlin said.

The governor’s surprise announcement will certainly change the political landscape. Lt. Gov. Phil Scott, a Republican and a member of Shumlin’s cabinet, said last week he was considering a run for the governor. He was not at Monday’s announcement.

And Democratic Speaker of the House Shap Smith told the Vermont Press Bureau after the legislative session ended last month that he wants to be governor, but did not want to run in a primary against Shumlin. Meanwhile, former state senator and current Google executive Matt Dunne, is also rumored to be considering a run.

Shumlin said he would work to ensure a Democrat succeeds him.

“I’m going fight to ensure that whoever takes my place as governor is a Democrat with the values and priorities to build upon, rather than undermine, the extraordinary progress we have made,” he said.

Now that the race for governor features no incumbent, more candidates are likely to explore the idea of running.

Shumlin said he plans to continue pushing for his agenda until his current term expires. He will push for an all-payer waiver from the federal government to transition the state to a new payment model for health care. He also promised to continue reforming the criminal justice system and focusing on opiate treatment. And, he said he would push for ending childhood homelessness, passing paid sick leave, and expanding renewable energy projects in Vermont.

A full story will appear in Tuesday’s editions of the Rutland Herald and the Barre-Montpelier Times Argus.

neal.goswami@timesargus.com

Matt Dunne: The comic book

13_Vermont 
Cartoonist James Sturm, the co-founder of the Center for Cartoon Studies in White River Junction, spent election day with former State Sen. Matt Dunne as he tried to get the Democratic nomination for governor.

And he produced this comic for Slate about the experience.

(Above, a Sen. Doug Racine supporter jokes with the cartoonist (a Dunne supporter).

– Dan Barlow

Dunne hits the airwaves with first ad

Democratic gubernatorial candidate Matt Dunne hits the airwaves this week with this ad, which hammers home one of his campaign's themes: The young are leaving Vermont.

He also mentions President Clinton, which will go over well with the primary voters.

– Dan Barlow

Matt Dunne: Ambition and love for Vermont

Bilde

The Vermont Press Bureau's profiles of the major gubernatorial candidates continued this past weekend with Matt Dunne.

Here's the lede:

By Peter Hirschfeld
Vermont Press Bureau – Published: July 25, 2010

Matt Dunne’s political arc took flight in front of a television set about 35 years ago, when he insisted his parents let him watch the era’s defining drama play out.

“I refused to go to preschool so I could watch the Watergate hearings,” says Dunne.

His precocious affinity for politics never waned. By the time he was 10, Dunne was helping a local politician – Peter Welch – hand out campaign fliers at the dump.

“Peter asked if I wanted to go,” Dunne says. “I couldn’t think of anything more exciting.”

You can read the rest of the story here.

– Dan Barlow

Dunne takes aim at Dubie

Democratic gubernatorial candidate Matt Dunne took aim at Republican Brian Dubie Thursday, criticizing the Lieutenant governor for his statements about the alleged poor business environment of Vermont.

Dubie has run advertisements pointing out a poor business-friendly ranking that Vermont got. Some of the Democrats were critical of Dubie's approach here, saying it essentially paints a bad picture of the state to outsiders.

In a press release today Dunne makes the case that the debate over the ranking is a distraction from the real discussion over the future of Vermont's economy.

Here's what he had to say:

“Our approaches could not be more different. Brian’s vague proposals have focused only on reducing taxes and eliminating red tape. However, during his tenure, Vermont has fallen to the bottom of the list in terms of states who use the Internet to engage its citizens and nearly last in transparency. During my experiences leading businesses in Vermont, I have found that Regional Development Corporations and Planning Commissions are currently head and shoulders above the current state government in terms of responsiveness. Yet the Lt. Governor’s position in supporting Challenges for Change was to cut funding dramatically to these advocates for jobs.”

– Dan Barlow