Tag Archives: Peter Shumlin

Capitol Beat with the Governor 4-24-15

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Gov. Peter Shumlin and Vermont Press Bureau chief Neal Goswami discuss competing health care plans, the governor’s intention to sign gun legislation and the merits of lowering the state’s sales tax by expanding it to services.

Shumlin says he will sign gun bill

MONTPELIER — Gov. Peter Shumlin said Friday he intends to sign a gun bill passed by both chambers after it is reviewed by his administration’s legal team.

Shumlin, a third-term Democrat, had remained noncommittal through Friday on whether he would sign the measure that cleared its final legislative hurdle on Thursday. The bill awaiting the governor’s signature makes it a crime at the state level for some convicts to possess a firearm. It also requires that the state report to a federal database the names of people found by a court to be mentally ill and a danger to themselves or others.

The Senate concurred Thursday with changes to S.141 made by the House that removed a waiting period of 18 months for those reported to the federal database to apply to have their names removed. The waiting period was a concern, according to Shumlin, who said Friday he was glad to see it removed.

After review Shumlin said he intends to sign the bill.

“I always like to read the bills and make sure that what I’ve been told is actually in there. But, if what I have been told is in that bill I will sign it,” Shumlin said in an interview Friday. “We always have our lawyers review them.”

The bill is a far cry from what was initially proposed. The original legislation, backed strongly by Gun Sense Vermont, included an expansion of federal background checks. Gun rights advocates turned out in force to a public hearing and the background check provision was scuttled.

But advocates of the legislation were able to keep the bill’s other components alive and guide it through the legislative process. In the end, one of the groups that opposed the bill most, the Vermont Federation of Sportsmens Clubs, the National Rifle Association’s state affiliate, dropped its objections.

Shumlin said the bill was scaled back enough for him to drop his own objections.

“I am very happy that the bill is a shadow of the bill that I objected to in the beginning. [Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Dick] Sears and others took out the parts that I really objected to. I think, now, most reasonable people would agree that it makes some common sense changes, similar to the kind of changes that I voted for when we didn’t allow … folks to take guns to schools,” the governor said.

While Gun Sense Vermont has indicated they view the legislation as a first step, Shumlin said he is no hurry to revisit the debate on expanded background checks.

“I feel that Vermont’s gun laws serve us well. I’d probably feel differently if I was the mayor of Chicago or the mayor of New York where you have all kinds of challenges. But, we in Vermont have a culture of using guns to manager our natural resources. We have a culture of hunting and caring for our natural resources that has served us well. We have a traditional respect for guns,” Shumlin said. “It’s different in a small rural state where you have a culture like Vermonters where we take care of each other, look out for each other. So that’s just what I feel and you’re not going to change my feelings.”

A full story will appear in Saturday’s editions of the Barre-Montpelier Times Argus and the Rutland Herald.

neal.goswami@timesargus.com

House advances paid sick leave bill

MONTPELIER — A bill to provide workers with paid sick time cleared the House Wednesday after majority Democrats defeated several attempts by Republicans to delay action on the measure.

After hours of debate, the chamber voted 76 to 66 in favor of providing earned sick time to most employees in Vermont. The bill would allow workers to earn a maximum of three days of paid time during the first two years of employment before increasing to five days. Those benefits would be available to workers after they put in 1,400 hours of work or after a year’s time with a company, whichever comes first.

Under the legislation, workers would be able to take paid time off that they have accrued for sickness, to care for a sick person in their care or even to care for children when there is a snow day at school.

Temporary and seasonal workers are exempt from the new mandate.

Rep. Helen Head

Rep. Helen Head

Rep. Helen Head, chairwoman of the House General, Housing and Military Affairs Committee, told her colleagues the bill would impact an estimated 60,000 workers in Vermont who do not currently have the option of earning paid time off. Similar measures have been introduced in the past but until Wednesday had been unable to clear either the House or Senate.

“This bill has been a decade in the making. The need is clear,” Head said.

Wednesday’s floor vote came after the bill was revived by scaling back its contents. Bill sponsor Rep. Tristan Toleno, D-Brattleboro, said he agreed to sponsor a bill that would be easier for businesses to adhere to. But even his original bill was scaled back by adding in longer waiting periods and limiting the amount of earned time that could accumulate.

Toleno said he was adamant about the bill being universal, however — meaning no special exemptions for small businesses. He said there was no logical place to draw such a line.

Rep. Steven Berry, D-Manchester, said he decided to vote for the bill after hearing that many small businesses would already be compliant with the bill’s requirements.

“I’ve come around 180 degrees in my perspective thanks to listening to people … and understanding exactly what it means to be fair in our state,” he said. “It is a standard to which all businesses should seek to aspire. I am very much for this particular bill.”

Rep. Steven Berry

Rep. Steven Berry

Others were firmly opposed.

Rep. Ronald Hubert, R-Milton, who owns a retail business, said between 10 and 12 “mom and pop stores” are closing every year because of state mandates.

“These are stores that can no longer, as a family business, make it anymore,” he said.

Rep. Butch Shaw, R-Florence, said he supports the concept of paid time off “but not by state mandate.” He also called a potential $5,000 for violating the mandate “unconscionable.”

“This bill may be well intended, but unfortunately, places another unfunded mandate on small businesses,” Shaw said.

Meanwhile, Rep. Cynthia Browning, D-Arlington, said businesses should be able to determine which benefits they offer.

“A business should have the right to operate their business as they see fit. They’re the ones with capital at risk,” she said.

Instead of mandating paid sick time, Browning said the state should create some type of insurance program that would allow the cost to businesses to be mitigated.

House Republicans made three motions during the three hour debate to send the bill to various committees for further review. Each motion was defeated. A fourth motion was made by Rep. Patrick Brennan, R-Colchester, to postpone action for one day until it could be determined how the legislation would impact state highway projects. That, too, was defeated.

Democratic Gov. Peter Shumlin announced last week that he supported the bill. He had resisted efforts to pass similar laws in the past but said the bill passed Wednesday eased his concerns about the impact on businesses.

“Most Vermonters agree that if you’re sick you shouldn’t be faced with the decision to either go to work and put others at risk or miss work, sacrifice your paycheck, and potentially lose your job. Many employers already provide fair earned leave policies. But some do not and that puts many Vermonters in a difficult and unfair situation,” Shumlin said in a statement after Wednesday’s vote. “In the past, I have been skeptical of proposals that did not do enough to recognize the costs and burdens to businesses this legislation might create. This bill addresses those concerns in a balanced and thoughtful way to provide this important benefit to Vermonters.”

Advocates said they will now look to the Senate to pass the bill. That seems unlikely, however, since the bill would first have to make it through the Senate Rules Committee because it did clear the House before the Legislature’s mid-way crossover deadline. The Senate committee is stacked with members who opposed such a law.

Still, Lindsay DesLauriers of the Main Street Alliance, who has lobbied for years for paid sick leave, said she and others will “try everything we can to pass it this year.”

“That would be an incredible turn of events. We see that. We know that. We acknowledge the challenges and we understand them. But, there is momentum around this bill right now. The governor came out for it. The president came out for it. We just had a pretty strong vote in the House,” she said.

The bill is up for final passage in the House on Thursday.

neal.goswami@timesargus.com

Shumlin apologizes for suicide remark

MONTPELIER — Gov. Peter Shumlin, facing more questions from reporters about the poor operation of Vermont Heath Connect, let loose his frustration Tuesday with a joke alluding to suicide during a news conference.

The governor last month promised that a key function missing from the state’s online health insurance marketplace would be in place by May 31. But with the self-imposed deadline fast approaching, the governor has faced continuing questions about what happens if the deadline is missed.

Last month, Shumlin promised that the so-called change of circumstance function, the ability for customers to change their personal information in their online accounts, would function by May 31. An automated renewal process was promised by the end of October. Missing either those deadlines would result in the administration beginning the process of switching to an exchange operated by the federal government, or perhaps a state-federal hybrid.

But the governor has seemed to back away from the first deadline, saying his administration would determine how to move forward in October — well after the initial May 31 deadline. House Speaker Shap Smith said last week that he wants to begin the process of moving away from Vermont Health Connect in June if change of circumstance is not working.

Asked several times what he intends to do on June 1 if change of circumstance is not working, the governor offered an off-color response.

“I’m going to find a high building,” Shumlin said. “I’m at the end of my rope. I don’t think the fifth floor [of the Pavillion Building where his office is located] is high enough.”

The governor’s office later issued a statement from the governor apologizing for the remark.

“Using that saying was an inappropriate way to express my frustration. It was insensitive and I apologize,” the governor said in the statement.

The governor’s remarks followed an emotional debate on the House floor last week over gun legislation in which mental illness and suicide were discussed.

Earlier in his exchange with reporters on Tuesday, Shumlin cautioned against creating conflicts over the deadline.

“I check on this with my team every day, sometimes three times a day. We all really want this to succeed. But, let’s focus on what we’re doing here. We’re on track. We’re optimistic that we’re on track. Why are we trying to create a fight over something that we may well never have to fight about,” he said.

“Let’s not create conflicts that we don’t need to have. I’m focused on trying to get the job done and I know the Legislature joins me in wanting the exchange to work,” Shumlin added.

Asked why he created the May 31 deadline in the first place, Shumlin said he wanted to ensure the public that his administration would seek other options if those lacking functions could not be completed.

“Because I feel like we’re all fed up. We’re all frustrated. Listen, this has been the most frustrating and disappointing experience of my public life. I’ve told you a million times that Vermonters and I are fed up. It’s incredibly frustrating,” he said.

neal.goswami@timesargus.com

Capitol Beat with the Governor 4-17-15

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Gov. Peter Shumlin discusses an audit of Vermont Health Connect and the exchange’s future.

Governor, speaker at odds over the future of Vermont Health Connect

MONTPELIER — House Speaker Shap Smith says he expects the state to move away from Vermont Health Connect if a key automated function is not in place by the end of May as promised by the Shumlin administration.

Smith’s comments, made Friday on WDEV’s The Mark Johnson Show, are in contrast to how the administration views the self-imposed deadline of May 31 to incorporate the so-called change of circumstance function into the state’s troubled online health insurance marketplace.

“If we don’t actually meet the May 31 deadline I just don’t see how we can go back to Vermonters and suggest that they should continue to have confidence in us to make the system work. So, I think that at that point in time we have to basically reassess where we’re going and my strong believe is that we need to explore other options,” Smith said.

House Speaker Shap Smith speaks on WDEV's The Mark Johnson show Friday, April, 17.

House Speaker Shap Smith speaks on WDEV’s The Mark Johnson show Friday, April, 17.

Gov. Peter Shumlin laid out a new time line for upgrading the exchange last month. He promised that change of circumstance, the ability for customers to make changes to their personal information online, would be working by the end of May. He also said that an automated system allowing costumers to sign up for health plans online would be in place by the fall.

At the time, Shumlin said if either of the new deadlines are missed the state would begin the process of moving to the exchange run by the federal government, or perhaps a state-federal hybrid model.

A performance audit released Thursday by Auditor Doug Hoffer questioned the state’s ability to meet those deadlines. Smith said he was troubled by the report.

“It caused some real concerns for me whether or not we’re going to be able to meet the May 31 deadline, which was set out by the administration. It calls into question, for me, whether the design of the system and the implementation date on May 31 is one that’s achievable,” he said.

Shumlin and Lawrence Miller, his chief of health care reform, now say that the administration will continue working on the change of circumstance functionality through the fall if it is not ready by May 31. They’ll determine whether to continue with Vermont Health Connect in the fall.

“If those aren’t working by November, by the end of November, we’re done. We’re going to either the federal exchange, which is a terrible choice for us, … or to some other hybrid,” Shumlin said in an interview Friday. “We believe that we will have change of circumstance working on May 31.”

Smith said he is not content to wait until the fall to determine how the state will proceed, however.

“The reality is that many Vermonters already have lost confidence in the exchange and I think that if we don’t meet another deadline it’s going to be almost impossible to get any confidence back at all,” he said.

Smith said Friday he is considering ways to force the administration to act if the May deadline is missed. It could involve having lawmakers return over the summer, although Smith acknowledged that only the governor has the authority to call them back into session.

“I could ask, and I think that we ought to be in a place where we have a structure set out that we can move in a different direction. Whether it needs to have the Legislature come back or there’s some other structure to do that, I think, is a matter for discussion,” Smith said.

Other options include using the Legislature’s Health Oversight Committee, Joint Fiscal Committee or Emergency Board to set in place a process to “have decision points to move to a different exchange.”

Shumlin on Friday maintained that the future of Vermont Health Connect will be determined by his administration this fall.

Gov. Peter Shumlin

Gov. Peter Shumlin

“What I laid out a month ago was that change of circumstance has to be working and have to have the bugs fixed to sign up folks in November and that’s when we’ll make that decision,” Shumlin said. “I think the speaker and I agree, this thing’s got to work.”

The governor declined to discuss the options laid out by Smith.

“We’re focused on getting it done,” Shumlin said. “I’m not going to sit here and talk about what happens if it doesn’t work. We’ve said what’s going to happen if it doesn’t work. If the two functions don’t work we’re moving on.”

neal.goswami@timesargus.com

Audit: Exchange remains high risk despite improvements

MONTPELIER — The state has been paying for work that hasn’t been performed and is at a high risk of failing to meet pending key deadlines in the development of the state’s online health insurance exchange, according to a performance audit released Thursday by State Auditor Doug Hoffer.

The audit also indicates growing unease by the state’s largest health insurance carrier, Blue Cross Blue Shield, over billing discrepancies amounting to millions of dollars in unpaid premiums on the company’s ledger.

The myriad malfunctions and setbacks associated with Vermont Health Connect have been well-documented since its bungled launch in October 2013. Key automated functions expected to be part of the online marketplace remain absent, and small businesses must still enroll offline directly through insurance carriers.

Doug Hoffer

Doug Hoffer

That is after nearly $200 million in federal funding has been spent by the state on planning, developing and implementing the exchange to meet requirements laid out in the federal Affordable Care Act.

Rather than rehash the exchange’s known shortcomings, Hoffer’s office spent the past several months reviewing the Shumlin administration’s response to those challenges and whether appropriate changes have been made to achieve the administration’s desired outcomes.

The results outlined in the report are mixed.

Gov. Peter Shumlin, a third-term Democrat, announced last month a new time frame for bringing key automated functions online. The ability to make online changes to one’s personal information, known as change of circumstance, will be in place by May 30, the administration now promises. An automated coverage renewal process will follow and in place by the fall — in time for the next open enrollment period.

Should those deadlines be missed, the administration said last month it will begin to transition away from its own exchange and attempt to migrate to one run by the federal government.

Hoffer’s report outlines several issues that makes meeting the deadlines questionable.

The state’s contract with Optum, the firm now developing VHC, contains no provision allowing the state to seek monetary consequences if it fails to deliver the missing functions. There are no financial penalties or liquidated damages like those in place with the state’s previous contractor, CGI, which the state parted ways with last fall. Nor is there a provision allowing the state to retain payment until the project is complete.

“Without these types of clauses, Optum has assumed little contractual risk and the State has limited its ability to seek recourse if the contractor’s performance is unacceptable. This seems to be a result of the State’s limited leverage to negotiate better terms,” the report states.

Meanwhile, the state does not have a contract in place to complete the second upgrade slated for the fall. If a contract is in place in the next couple of months then completing the project “is considered feasible,” according to the report.

Still, the state will not know if it has the funding to pay for all of the development work until it negotiates a price with Optum. The state would have to reduce the scope of work or find additional funding sources if the developer’s prices is higher than the federal funding available.

“According to an independent verification and validation contractor, as of April 3, 2015, the VHC development project has been in long-term “red,” or high-risk, status due to continuous contracting delays and unresolved agreement on the scope to support all VHC requirements,” the report states.

Hoffer’s report also raises concerns about competition for the staffing and technical resources within state government needed to meet the administration’s self-imposed deadlines. It notes that a March 16 internal project status report indicated that the resources to help meet those deadlines had not yet been confirmed. And there was a lack of agreement between various Agency of Human Services departments about which resources would be allocated to the VHC system development project.

Lawrence Miller, Shumlin’s chief of health care reform and the man charged with righting the ship, acknowledged the report is highly critical and lacks confidence in the administration’s ability to meets its deadlines.

Lawrence Miller

Lawrence Miller

“I don’t know that the track record of Vermont Health Connect has given anybody the basis for confidence,” he said in an interview before the audit’s release. “I think that the auditor’s assessment of the risk of completing the project on time is accurate. There is not a lot of slack in the schedule.”

Still, Miller said the administration remains confident the work will be completed on time.

“This has been done with a good, detailed project plan. Optum and the carriers are saying it’s achievable,” he said. “Things are happening on time.”

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State workers, supporters rally against cuts

MONTPELIER — Hundreds rallied at the State House Saturday to oppose cuts to the state budget and $10.8 million in labor savings sought by both the Shumlin administration and lawmakers in an event organized by the Vermont State Employees Association.

The state employees’s union was joined by other unions and groups, including the Vermont NEA, AFSCME and the Vermont Workers Center, to protest the the budget plan sought by Gov. Peter Shumlin and lawmakers.

VSEA members and supporters held a rally at the State House Saturday, April 11, 2015.

VSEA members and supporters held a rally at the State House Saturday, April 11, 2015.

The House has passed a budget that uses $33 million in new tax revenue, $53 million in cuts and $25 million in one-time funds to close a $113 million budget gap. The VSEA and others, however, want to see more tax revenue raised and fewer cuts.

The House-passed budget includes $10.8 million in labor savings that Shumlin, a Democrat, proposed. He has asked the VSEA to renegotiate its contract to help achieve the savings. Failing to do so will result in hundreds of layoffs, according to the administration.

About $2 million in labor savings has been identified by the administration, but $8.8 million remains of its target. It wants to delay by six months a 2.5 percent cost of living increase due to state employees in the 2016 fiscal year, and delay by one-year step-increases that average out to an additional 1.7 percent pay increase next year. Those steps would require union approval.

The union has so far refused to renegotiate, and has proposed ways to raise additional revenue instead. The 500 or so people gathered at the State House Saturday heard from Ed Olsen, a snow plow driver for the Agency of Transportation, about why the union is not willing to renegotiate.

“I pay taxes to this great state of Vermont, just like all the other hardworking, middle-class people. As a matter of fact, we, the middle-class Vermonters, pay more than 10 percent of our wages to this beautiful statehouse behind me, unlike the wealthy citizens who pay back 8 percent of their wages to our economy,” Olsen said. “That ain’t right. It pisses me off. That’s the biggest reason why I came here today.”

Olsen said the state’s wealthiest residents “aren’t being asked to give up anything.”

Agency of Transportation worker Ed Olsen speaks at State House rally Saturday, April 11, 2015.

Agency of Transportation worker Ed Olsen speaks at State House rally Saturday, April 11, 2015.

“I’m tired of being asked to give back more and more of my wages and benefits to help rescue Vermont’s economy,” he said. “I need every bit of the cash I earn. Vermont has a budget deficit and they always want to balance the budget on the backs of hardworking, middle-class citizens of Vermont.”

Several speakers compared Shumlin to Wisconsin Republican Gov. Scott Walker, who has sought concessions from union workers to help save money in that state, including Rev. Earl Kooperkamp of Church of the Good Shepherd in Barre.

“Vermont is not Wisconsin. Peter Shumlin is not Scott Walker. But it’s getting pretty damn hard to tell the difference,” he said.

Kooperkamp equated the effort to obtain savings from state workers to the seventh commandment — thou shalt not steal.

“It’s wrong, it’s immoral, and we’re here to say that,” Kooperkamp said.

The Shumlin administration is expected to meet again early next week to continue negotiations.

neal.goswami@timesargus.com

Capitol Beat with the Governor 04-10-15

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Gov. Peter Shumlin chats with Vermont Press Bureau chief Neal Goswami about the ongoing process to find $10.8 million in labor savings from the Vermont State Employees Association. He also discusses a failed effort to ban teacher strikes and lawmakers’ efforts pare down his legislative proposals.

Shumlin decries price hike in opiate overdose antidote

MONTPELIER — Gov. Peter Shumlin is asking the maker of a drug that serves as an antidote for opiate overdoses and has saved nearly 200 lives in Vermont to curb rapidly-rising prices as demand for the drug grows.

Shumlin, speaking at a State House news conference Wednesday, said the price of naloxone, made by Amphastar Pharmaceuticals, has jumped 62 percent in about a month. The cost of 10 doses of the nasal spray cost the state $113 in early March. Now, that cost has jumped 62 percent to $183, according to Shumlin.

“As the demand has increased, as smart states like Vermont have said, ‘We’re not going to let folks who suffer from disease die before our eyes because we don’t have the courage to have the rescue kits available,’ the company CEO has said, ‘Great, how can we make some more money on this?’” Shumlin said.

Gov. Peter Shumlin speaks at a State House news conference Wednesday, April 8, 2015.

Gov. Peter Shumlin speaks at a State House news conference Wednesday, April 8, 2015.

“My suspicion is the price increase is the result of capitalist instincts for more money,” the governor added.

Shumlin and members of his Criminal Justice and Substance Abuse Cabinet sent a letter to Amphastar CEO Jack Zhang Wednesday asking that the company “return to more reasonable prices.”

State officials say nearly 1,900 doses of Naloxone have been distributed around the state. Shumlin signed legislation to equip every Vermont State Trooper with the drug and distribute it to first responders and addiction treatment centers.

Shumlin said about 10 percent of the naloxone kits have been used and saved a life.

“We have saved 190 lives that we know about, that have been recorded by my Department of Health, as a result of getting this simple procedure in folks’ pockets,” he said.

But Bob Bick, CEO of the Howard Center in Burlington, said the state continues to battle opiate addiction and treatment needs are still not being met.

“The reality is that we continue to have a significant opiate addiction problem in the state of Vermont. We need to be focusing on prevention, treatment and intervention,” he said.

Bick said the Howard Center has 305 people on a waiting list and another 500 people have made contact with the agency but have not yet made it on to a waiting list. Those are the people that are most likely to need doses of naloxone, according to Bick.

“It’s really about those folks who are on the waiting list and the folks who have contacted us that we’re having this conversation today about naloxone. It really is about saving lives and the reality is, and I know it sounds trite, but this is a life and death issue,” he said.

The letter asks for the company to extend the same $6 rebates it negotiated with New York to other states.

“We implore your company to stop the steep increase in the price of naloxone, which is threatening our efforts to distribute rescue kits and save lives,” the letter reads. “Opiate addiction is a disease, and in Vermont we are treating it as such. We are reducing the stigma associated with addiction, expanding treatment, and saving lives. The soaring cost of naloxone threatens to thwart our progress.”

Shumlin said the company has not offered the state any explanation for the rapid hike in price. He said he doubts that higher demand for the drug is the cause.

“It’s entirely possible that’s the case, and if so, I would urge the company to make more of it because they’re being successful. But, generally, in the pharmaceutical industry, the trend has never been quite that altruistic when it comes to pricing for Americans buying pharmaceutical products,” he said.

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders and Maryland Rep. Elijah Cummings sent their own letter to Amphastar last month inquiring about the rising cost of naloxone.

neal.goswami@timesargus.com

Dem leaders look to kill ban on teacher strikes

MONTPELIER — Democratic leaders are maneuvering to amend a bill slated to hit the House floor Wednesday by replacing language that calls for a ban on teacher strikes and the imposition of labor contracts by school boards with a study.

That would significantly weaken the legislation, H.76, that has been pushed heavily by Republican Rep. Kurt Wright of Burlington. Although he has secured a vote on the bill from Democratic leaders, they are now looking to kill off key parts.

In addition to the ban on strikes and contract impositions, it would institute a 1-cent tax rate increase on districts that cannot reach a contract agreement within one year.

Rep. Tim Jerman

Rep. Tim Jerman

House Deputy Assistant Majority Leader Tim Jerman, D- Essex, said Democrats are considering an amendment to be offered on the House floor that would institute a study on whether teacher strikes should be banned.

“We anticipate having an amendment tomorrow that will change that somewhat substantially and be a study looking at the whole issue,” he said. “As of right now that’s what’s on the table.”

Jerman said he believes the Democratic leadership team will secure enough votes to pass an amended bill that will provide “an unfettered study that isn’t biased one way or the other.”

“I think so,” Jerman said. “It’s been a difficult count because the bill keeps changing.”

The bill is getting a floor vote because of commitments made by the leadership team in order to move a larger education bill through the chamber. Wright and others are now working to secure enough votes to maintain the strike ban.

Wright, who plans to hold a news conference about the bill Tuesday morning, said he expects some independents and about 12 to 15 Democrats will join the Republican caucus. It’s unclear whether that coalition can fend off the Democratic leadership’s efforts, though.

“I think that it’s time for us to act. This bill has been around for a long time,” Wright said. “We either want to ban strikes and the imposition of contracts or not.”

Rep. Kurt Wright

Rep. Kurt Wright

House Minority Leader Don Turner said House Republicans will stand together in support of the ban.

“We feel that it’s time to implement the ban on strikes. I think there’s been enough harm over the years, the most recent in South Burlington. It’s time to stop that. Police officers, fire fighters, they’re essential. They can’t strike. I think it’s time in Vermont to put teachers under that same category,” he said.

But he, too, said it is unclear how the House will vote on Wednesday.

“I am very hopeful. I am confident in our caucus and where we’re going to be. The problem is I don’t know what the (Democrats) will be offering up to their members to not vote for it. All we can do is stick together to support this.”

The bill cleared the House Education Committee on a 8 to 3 vote. However, the General, Housing and Military Affairs Committee, which oversees labor issues, rejected the bill on a 5 to 3 vote.

The bill puts the Vermont NEA, which opposes the bill, at odds with the Vermont School Boards Association, which supports it. Gov. Peter Shumlin angered the union last fall when he declared during an ongoing teacher strike in South Burlington that such strikes should be banned.

neal.goswami@timesargus.com

Capitol Beat with the Governor 4-3-15

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Gov. Peter Shumlin chats with Vermont Press Bureau chief Neal Goswami about the House’s health care bill. He’s not a fan.

State plans to end child and family homelessness

MONTPELIER — State officials are rolling out initiatives to end child and family homelessness in Vermont by 2020.

Monday morning, Gov. Peter Shumlin and Agency of Human Services Sec. Hal Cohen announced plans by the state to follow federal models to end child and family homelessness, including the construction of affordable housing and the consolidation of services to prevent homelessness in the first place.

“The stress and instability of homelessness can have profound impacts on children’s health, behavioral development and educational achievement,” Cohen said. “It’s time to wake up and realize that this is intolerable and that we are responsible to build the Vermont we want to see. For families without housing, we can do better than a motel room on cold nights.”

On any given night, there are approximately 1,500 homeless people in Vermont, with about half of the population in the state’s emergency shelters comprised of families.

Among families with children, homelessness is on the rise. According to annual data collected from school districts and supervisory unions by the Agency of Education, the number of homeless children in Vermont has risen 46 percent during the past five years, from 784 in 2010 to 1,145 in 2014.

The state will model its effort to end child and family homelessness after a framework developed by the U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness, said Angus Chaney, director of housing for the Agency of Human Services.

“The family connection framework is the whole suite of programs that cities and states are finding most effective in ending homelessness,” said Chaney, who said the federal framework is focused on quickly connecting homeless families with housing.

“It front loads financial assistance to get someone in permanent housing within a week or a month, and provides services and financial assistance when needed,” Chaney continued. “The focus is to get them into housing quicker.”

The initiatives will be rolled out in Rutland and Washington counties with the Homeless Prevention Center in Rutland and Capstone Community Action in Barre.

Deborah Hall, executive director of the Homeless Prevention Center, said the plan calls for the creation of a database for the sharing of information among the various entities that offer social services “so households won’t have to tell their story 15 times.”

Hall said another initiative includes coordinating with landlords in a given region to develop a list of available housing, again, with the goal of securing housing for a homeless family as quickly as possible.

Monday’s announcement came as Shumlin announced a $580,000 federal grant to build 14 units of affordable housing and a new day station in the Burlington area.

“Even with serious budget challenges, we are fortunate in Vermont to have many of the programs and partnerships already in place to support an ambitious initiative,” Shumlin said. “We can build on these foundations to achieve the goal of ending childhood and family homelessness by 2020.”

Chaney declined to speculate on how many units of affordable housing will need to be built, or how much it might cost the state to meet the goal of eliminating child and family homelessness in the next five years.

“This is a marathon, not a sprint, and I know this will evolve into directions we don’t yet see,” Chaney said. “As we look at the data, it will drive what we launch and where we launch.”

Unemployment rate drops to pre-recession level

MONTPELIER — Vermont’s unemployment rate for February was the lowest in nearly eight years.

The state Department of Labor released its monthly jobs report Friday, showing the state had a seasonally adjusted unemployment rate of 3.9 percent for February, a decrease of 0.2 percent compared with the month before.

According to the report, February was the first time the state unemployment rate has fallen below 4 percent since May 2007.

“Vermont’s unemployment rate — at 3.9 percent — is back as low as those reported before the recession,” said Annie Noonan, commissioner of the state Department of Labor, who noted the report is a sign of “better economic conditions in certain parts of the state.”

Of the 17 labor markets around the state — statistics for which are not seasonally adjusted — every one of them saw a decline in unemployment, with some regions, such as Bennington, Rutland and Barre-Montpelier seeing a monthly drop of 0.6 percent.

The Burlington-South Burlington region had the lowest monthly unemployment rate at 3 percent, while Derby continued to have the highest unemployment rate at 7.7 percent.

Without seasonal adjustment, the state unemployment rate for February was 4.1 percent, a decline of 0.5 percent.

February’s numbers will be subject to revision in the coming months, but, according to the Department of Labor, final numbers for December 2014 show the state added approximately 3,400 jobs compared with December 2013.
Gov. Peter Shumlin welcomed the February job report.

“This is positive news for Vermont’s economy,” Shumlin said. “Combined with the revised jobs numbers released last month, which showed an increase of 3,400 jobs in 2014, Vermont’s economy continues its recovery and is moving in the right direction. We still have a lot of work to do to ensure Vermont’s economy works for every single Vermonter.”

George Malek is president of the Central Vermont Chamber of Commerce, where the Barre-Montpelier region saw its monthly unemployment rate fall from 5.1 percent in January to 4.5 percent in February.

“People who are putting their own money at risk are doing a lot of construction, and that is always a good sign,” Malek said. “Up until the last six to 12 months, things have been lagging, other than rebuilding things that had been damaged four years ago.”

“I am cautiously optimistic that those people who have put their money on the line have a good reason to do so. They tend to be much better judges of what’s out there,” Malek continued. “I take some heart in their willingness to step up to the plate.”

The Rutland region saw its monthly unemployment rate fall from 4.8 percent in January to 4.2 percent in February.

“On a local basis, there has seen some manufacturing hiring going on. General Electric continues to add jobs, so that certainly helps to improve those numbers,” said Tom Donahue, CEO and executive director of the Rutland Region Chamber of Commerce.

Donahue said the increase in manufacturing jobs has offset the loss of retail jobs following the closure of Aubuchon Hardware, Sears, and, in April, J.C. Penny.

Capitol Beat with the Governor 3-27-15

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Gov. Peter Shumlin chats with Vermont Press Bureau chief Neal P. Goswami about the health care package in play in the House, new unemployment numbers and gun legislation that cleared the Senate this week.

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