16 Types Of Cherry Wood From Around The World  Update 12/2021

types of cherry wood

Cherry wood is a type of hardwood that comes in many varieties, each with their own set of properties. From the dense and strong to the light and soft, there’s a cherry for every use.

Cherry wood has been used for centuries as furniture, paneling, flooring, etc., but it also makes an excellent choice for musical instruments such as guitars or violins because it produces good resonance when struck.

This article will introduce 16 types of cherry wood and their properties to help you determine which one would make the best fit for the project you have in mind.

Brazilian Cherry wood

Brazilian Cherry wood

A very hard wood, Brazilian cherry grows at a quick rate and is extremely resinous. Because of this, it seals up nicely when exposed to natural oils. Frequent oiling is recommended for longevity. As far as coloring goes, you’ll see red sapwood in the early stages of growth with reddish brown heartwood further on.

Brazilian cherry is very strong and stable, so it’s great for outdoor use. It works well as a flooring material in areas that see high traffic and can handle some moisture. It’s also ideal for patio furniture because its density helps protect from damage due to the elements and makes it more resistant to insect attack.

A few downsides of Brazilian cherry are that it takes a lot of sanding to get the surface smooth and it dulls tools faster than other types of cherry.

European Cherry wood

Growing at a moderate pace, European cherry has been around for hundreds of years because it’s so versatile and easy to work with. It’s commonly used to make furniture, doors, etc., but it also has some uses in the lumber industry and is even used as a source of hardwood charcoal.

It has reddish brown colors with pale sapwood that gives it an appealing look. European cherry is very stable and resists warping, along with insect attack. It also has a medium texture that works well for musical instruments.

The downside of European cherry is that it’s susceptible to cracking and splitting when exposed to moisture or extreme changes in humidity, so be sure to keep it in a controlled environment whenever possible.

Burmese Cherry wood

Burmese Cherry wood

Another type of mahogany, Burmese cherry is a very dense hardwood that’s actually tougher than most types of mahogany. It does have a tendency to curl if left unsupported in the early stages of growth, but don’t let its density fool you -it can be worked with metal tools without dulling them as much as other woods.

As its name implies, Burmese cherry is found in Burma. The wood has a reddish color with light brown stripes and makes an excellent choice for furniture and musical instruments. It’s also favored by the lumber industry because it can be used to make everything from flooring to cabinets.

The only downside of Burmese cherry is that it’s not as strong against the elements, so it won’t stand up to extreme heat or cold like other types of hardwoods.

Chinese Cherry wood

The most common type of cherry tree in China, Chinese cherry grows quickly and has a very high resistance to decay. It also doesn’t require a lot of maintenance and is very stable, making it ideal for outdoor use.

Chinese cherry has reddish brown colors with stripes of white or yellow that give its wood patterned appearance. It’s most often used to make furniture and flooring, but it’s also favored by lumber industries because it’s easy to deal with and makes for high-quality products.

During the early stages of growth, Chinese cherry is susceptible to warping, but once it matures you’ll rarely see any signs of damage.

The finish on this type of cherry needs a lot of work because it dulls tools quickly, but that just means it’s easier to smooth down and gives you more control over the quality of its surface.

Japanese Cherry wood

Japanese Cherry wood

As far as hardness goes, Japanese cherry is one of the most resistant types of hardwood available. It also grows at a very slow rate and is quite dense, so it makes for an excellent top choice when using sawhorses or any sort of outdoor furniture.

Japanese cherry has a reddish color with yellow stripes, making it a top choice for flooring and cabinets. It’s also ideal for musical instruments and trimwork because it holds its shape well and doesn’t crack easily when the humidity is bumped up or down.

The only downside of Japanese cherry is that it’s a little too durable for some uses. In particular, it dulls cutting tools extremely quickly and requires a lot of sanding to get the surface smooth, so you have to be extra careful when working with this type of hardwood.

Kimberly Cherry Wood

The eco-friendly option of hardwood, Kimberly cherry is very slow growing and has a high resistance to decay. It’s also native to the Pacific Northwest, making it an excellent choice for outdoor furniture or flooring as long as you don’t live in extreme temperature zones.

Kimberly cherry has a reddish color with brown stripes and a medium texture that’s easy to work with. It’s also commonly used to make cabinets and flooring, but Kimberly cherry is most often seen in very high-end furniture or trimwork because it can become quite expensive when left exposed without any sort of protective finish.

Brazilian Cherry wood

While Brazilian cherry isn’t as common in the United States, it’s found throughout South America and has an interesting history. It was first discovered by a Spanish missionary named Father Navarrete in 1732 when he wrote about it during his travels through Central and South America.

Brazilian cherry is reddish brown with dark stripes and a medium texture. It’s hard and dense with a high resistance to decay, so it makes for an excellent choice when using sawhorses or flooring.

Brazilian cherry is susceptible to warping in early stages of growth, but once it matures you can expect almost no damage from this kind of wood. It also dulls cutting tools quickly, so you have to choose your lumber carefully and spend a lot of time smoothing it down if you plan on using exposed wood

Brazilian cherry is most often seen in trimwork or other high-end uses where the price tag justifies its quality. It’s also used to make cabinets because it’s quite resistant and easy to work with.

Acer saccharum is an Asian variety of cherry wood that’s commonly used for flooring. It’s reddish brown with a medium texture and tight grain, making it easy to finish.

It doesn’t have many uses outside of floors because it has a very low resistance to decay, but it makes for an excellent choice if the material is properly treated.

Acer palmatum is a Japanese cherry wood that’s native to China and Japan. It’s reddish brown with dark stripes and a medium texture.

It grows very slowly and has a high resistance to decay, so it makes for a good choice of hardwood when using sawhorses or cabinets. It’s also quite durable and easy to work with, so you can expect a long lifespan from this type of wood if you purchase it in the right conditions.

Acer palmatum has a number of uses beyond its resistance to decay because it’s quite flexible and easy to live with. You can expect it in flooring, trimwork, or even cabinets.

Patagonian Cherry wood

Patagonian Cherry wood

Native to South America, Patagonian cherry is a reddish brown with dark stripes and a medium texture.

It’s resistant to decay because of its high tannin content; however, it’s not very durable when exposed to humidity or extreme temperature swings.

Patagonian cherry is most often seen in trimwork, cabinets, or flooring where it can be properly preserved. You should not use this type of wood for sawhorses because it expands and contracts too easily when exposed to humidity changes.

African rosewood cherry wood

Native to Africa and sub-Saharan portions of the Sahel region, African rosewood is a reddish brown with dark stripes. It’s a hard wood with a medium texture and high tannin content, making it resistant to decay when you treat the material properly.

African rosewood is most often used for cabinets because of its durability and strength, but some people will use it for flooring or trimwork as long as they don’t expose the surface to excessive humidity.

It’s a bit more expensive than other types of cherry wood, but if you treat it right then it can be very durable because its high tannin content creates a natural barrier against moisture and insects.

Mahogany cherry wood

Mahogany cherry wood

Native to the Pacific side of Central America, mahogany cherry is a reddish brown with dark stripes and a medium texture. It’s hard with a high tannin content and durability, making it resistant to decay when you treat the wood properly.

Mahogany cherry is most often seen in flooring because of its superior resistance to moisture, but it can also be used in cabinets, trimwork, sawhorses and other applications where durability is the top priority.

American Cherry wood

Native to the eastern states, American cherry is a red with dark marks and a medium texture. It’s hard with a low tannin content, making it susceptible to decay when you don’t treat it properly.

American cherry generally isn’t used for flooring or trimwork because of its susceptibility to moisture; however, it’s quite easy to work with and make cabinets out of. You can also use it for sawhorses or other uses where moisture isn’t a problem.

African cherry wood

African cherry wood

Native to the African continent, African cherry is a red color with dark stripes and a medium texture. It’s hard with a high tannin content, so it has superior resistance to decay when you treat the wood properly.

African cherry is most often used for cabinets because of its durability, but some people will use it for trimwork, flooring or other applications where durability is the priority.

Mocaya Cherry wood

Native to Central America, mocaya is a reddish brown with dark stripes and a medium texture. It’s hard with a high tannin content, making it resistant to decay when you treat the material properly. 

Mocaya cherry is most often used for trimwork or cabinets because of its durability, but you can also use it for flooring or sawhorses as long as you don’t expose the surface to excessive humidity.

Bolivian Cherry wood

Bolivian Cherry wood

Native to South America, bolivian is a reddish brown with dark stripes and a medium texture. It’s hard with a low tannin content, making it susceptible to decay when you don’t treat the wood properly.

Bolivian cherry is most often seen in cabinets as long as you care for the wood properly. It can also be used for flooring, trimwork and sawhorses as long as you don’t expose the surface to excessive humidity.

The beautiful colors of cherry wood make it a favorite for people who want something that looks good while also being strong enough to use for important projects like cabinets or flooring.

Cherry wood is not easy to work with, so you must be careful when handling your project. Always make sure that the wood is treated properly and never leave it exposed to moisture for an extended period of time or the wood will begin to decay and become damaged.

Cauvery Cherry wood

Native to the southern portion of India, Cauvery is a reddish brown with dark stripes and a medium texture. It’s hard with a high tannin content that makes it resistant to decay when you treat the wood properly.

Cauvery cherry is most often used for cabinets because of its durability, but it can also be used for trimwork, flooring or sawhorses if you take care of the wood.

Caribbean Cherry wood

Native to Central America, the Caribbean is a reddish brown with dark stripes and a medium texture. It’s hard with high tannin content that makes it resistant to decay when you take care of the wood properly.

Caribbean cherry is most often seen in cabinets because of its durability, but you can also use it for flooring, trimwork or sawhorses as long as you don’t expose the surface to excessive humidity.

FAQs

– What is the meaning of cherry wood?

Cherry wood refers to a type of wood found in various parts of the world. It’s usually red with dark stripes and is known for its durability.

It can be used in a variety of applications from cabinets, trim work, flooring, or sawhorses. You must care for it properly when using or exposing it to moisture if you want it to avoid becoming deformed.

– How do you care for cherry wood properly?

You can care for cherry wood properly by making sure it doesn’t come in contact with moisture and by sanding the surface to make it smooth. You’ll also want to apply a finish that will keep the wood from becoming warped or damaged during use.

– What is the ideal flooring application for cherry wood?

Cherry wood works well for flooring overall, but it’s not ideal for use in kitchens because the moisture from cooking or cleaning is a bad combination for cherry wood.

If you want to use cherry wood flooring in a kitchen, take care of it properly by installing a vapor barrier and coating the surface with polyurethane.

– What are some precautions to take when using cherry wood in cabinets?

Cherry wood can be used in a variety of cabinet applications, but make sure the piece you’re working with is properly treated before installation. Cherry wood becomes susceptible to decay if it’s not protected from moisture or humidity.

If you want to use cherry wood for cabinetry, consider installing a vapor barrier to help protect the wood from moisture damage.

Conclusion

The article has provided a list of cherry wood types and their function. If you are looking to use this type of wood in your own home, make sure that the surface is properly treated before installation. It should also be cared for regularly to keep it from becoming warped or damaged while being used.

The care instructions vary depending on the kind of cherry wood you decide to install into cabinets, trim work, flooring or sawhorses- but take care because if not maintained correctly, any piece can become susceptible to decay when exposed too long with moisture.

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