12 Types Of Jasmine Flowers You Should Know Update 12/2021

Types of Jasmine Flowers

Jasmine flowers are a popular choice for brides, and the fragrant blossoms have been an Airport part of many cultures since ancient times. In this article, we’ll explore twelve different types of jasmine flowers from all over the world and learn about their characteristics.

Brief About Jasmine

Jasmine is a genus of about 200 species in the olive family, Oleaceae. It contains shrubs, subshrubs and vines native to tropical and subtropical regions of Eurasia, Africa and Oceania.

The best-known species is Jasminum officinale (common jasmine), which was brought into Europe from India by the French physician Jean-Baptiste Lamarck in 1785. The flowers are borne on long stems that often require climbing supports or staking. In some cases they possess a pleasant fragrance; however, this does not always hold true as there are also many varieties of jasmine with no scent at all.

12 Different Types Of Jasmine Flowers

Jasminum officinale (common jasmine)

Jasminum officinale (common jasmine)

Common jasmine is a vigorous, evergreen twining climber with glossy leaves, and inconspicuous greenish-yellow or white flowers that are highly fragrant at night. It is native to northern India but is now widely grown throughout the tropics and subtropics.

Most varieties are grown for their strongly fragrant flowers. The small white flowers have a delicate sweet aroma that can perfume an entire garden in summer, and the same variety may also produce attractive green leaves that contrast with its season colours.

It will grow easily from cuttings taken in spring or semi-ripe wood, which is harvested in early autumn (after the plant has flowered).

 Jasminum sambac (Sri Lanka jasmine)

Sri Lanka Jasmine grows from tubers with flowers that are strongly fragrant. Its leaves are long, thin and dark green. The burgundy-coloured flowers hang in clusters and bloom in late autumn to early winter, often lasting well into the winter.

The plant is native to Sri Lanka, but has become naturalised in other tropical regions of the world and is widely cultivated for its flowers.

Like other jasmines, it is used in the perfumery and pharmaceutical industries. It is a creeper that can be grown on a trellis or wall in tropical areas where it will produce flowers and leaves year round.

Jasminum polyanthum (Tea-scented jasmine)

Jasminum polyanthum (Tea-scented jasmine)

The Tea-scented Jasmine has a climbing, twining habit. It can reach heights of up to ten feet and blooms in mid summer with fragrant clusters of creamy white flowers.

The leaves are evergreen, smooth, shiny green and bright red when young. The Flowers are star-shaped, cream white and fragrant with a strong tea scent.

“Jasminum polyanthum” grows well in the warmth of summer and likes light shade in the cooler months. Is suitable for planting under trees or can stand on its own against fences.  It is one of the few fragrant jasmines that is also cold hardy.

It is suited to USDA Hardiness Zones: 9-11, but will only tolerate temperatures down to -4°F (-20°C) or so.

Jasminum stellatum (Cape jasmine)

The Cape Jasmine is an evergreen twining vine for growing on trellises, fences or other supports. It has thin leaves and attractive star-shaped white flowers with a strong jasmine scent. The plants flower in summer (autumn in the Southern Hemisphere) and are sometimes used as groundcover. It is a very hardy plant, and easy to grow once established.

The Cape jasmine can be grown in shade or sun but prefers partial shade. In the springtime it may suffer from mildew; however, this problem disappears when the leaves mature.  Cape Jasmine is easily propagated from stem-tip cuttings. It also propagates easily by layering in summer, when the vine tips are partially buried and will root wherever they touch moist ground.

Jasminum sambac var. grandiflora , commonly known as Grandiflorum jasmine or Sampaguita is a species of jasmine native to Sri Lanka and widely cultivated elsewhere in tropical regions. It is an evergreen shrub or small tree growing to 5 m tall. The leaves are opposite, simple, 10–30 cm long and 6–17 cm broad with a serrated margin.

The flowers are produced in clusters of several together; each flower has a white corolla 1.5–2 cm diameter with four fairly equal-sized lips; they are strongly fragrant, especially in the evening. The fruit is a capsule containing numerous small brown seeds which do not require pre-soaking prior to sowing.

Jasminum sinense (Chinese jasmine)

Jasminum sinense (Chinese jasmine)

Chinese Jasmine is a twining climber growing to 10 m. It has long, slender green leaves, with small white flowers from late summer to autumn. The flowers have a strong jasmine scent and are followed by decorative red berries.

This plant can be easily propagated from semi-ripe cuttings in early summer, and from green cuttings in late summer. It will also set seed, but the resulting plants may not be true to type. The best time for transplanting is mid-summer.

If grown against a south-facing wall, it will tolerate some shade. In light shade, it will flower less profusely than in full sun, but these flowers are larger and have a stronger fragrance.

Jasminum sinense is used as a medicinal plant. It has been shown to be effective in vitro for treating Plasmodium falciparum (malaria organism).

Jasminum fruticans (winter jasmine)

Winter jasmine is an evergreen climber or twiner. It has long, slender leaves with small white flowers from late summer to autumn. The flowers have a strong jasmine scent and are followed by decorative red berries.

This plant can be easily propagated from semi-ripe cuttings in early summer, and from green cuttings in late summer. It will also set seed, but the resulting plants may not be true to type.

The best time for transplanting is mid-summer. If grown against a south-facing wall, it will tolerate some shade. In light shade, it will flower less profusely than in full sun, but these flowers are larger and have a stronger fragrance. It tolerates seaside conditions, and will grow well on a banksia garden.

Jasminum dichotomum (Jasmine bracteata)

Jasminum dichotomum (Jasmine bracteata)

The jasmine bracteatum is a species of Jasmine, native to eastern Asia. It grows as an evergreen shrub to 1–2 m tall, with leathery leaves about 7 cm long and 3 cm broad, green above and paler beneath. The flowers are produced in groups of 2-10 together, each flower about 2 cm diameter, with five white to pale green petals.

They have a strong jasmine scent; flowering is from late winter to spring. The flowers form in clusters at the ends of branches and along the stem.They are followed by berries 5–8 mm in diameter which turn bright red when ripe, in late summer and early autumn.

This plant can be easily propagated from semi-ripe cuttings in early summer, and from green cuttings after the end of summer. It will also set seed, but the resulting plants may not be true to type. The best time for transplanting is mid-summer.

If grown against a south-facing wall, it will tolerate some shade. In light shade, it will flower less profusely than in full sun, but these flowers are larger and have a stronger fragrance.

Jasminum nudiflorum (Nootka jasmine)

Nootka jasmine is a species of flowering shrub in the olive family, Oleaceae. Other common names include naked-flowered jasmine or wild white jasmine. It grows in dry coastal forests along Pacific coastlines from Alaska to California at altitudes up to 150 m (500 ft). It has leathery, narrow obovate or oblong leaves up to 15 cm long.

The flowers have a strong jasmine scent and are clustered at the ends of branches; they are followed by decorative purple berries. This plant can be easily propagated from semi-ripe cuttings in early summer, and from green cuttings after the end of summer.

It will also set seed, but the resulting plants may not be true to type. The best time for transplanting is mid-summer. If grown against a south-facing wall, it will tolerate some shade. In light shade, it will flower less profusely than in full sun, but these flowers are larger and have a stronger fragrance.

Jasminum fluminense (Brazilian jasmine)

Jasminum fluminense (Brazilian jasmine)

Brazilian jasmine is an evergreen climber. It has long, slender leaves with small white flowers from late summer to autumn. The flowers have a strong jasmine scent and are followed by decorative red berries.

This plant can be easily propagated from semi-ripe cuttings in early summer, and from green cuttings in late summer. It will also set seed, but the resulting plants may not be true to type.

The best time for transplanting is mid-summer. If grown against a south-facing wall, it will tolerate some shade. In light shade, it will flower less profusely than in full sun, but these flowers are larger and have a stronger fragrance.

Jasminum humile (Mallow jasmine)

The shrub is fast growing and reaches about 1.3 m tall, with leathery leaves up to 6 cm long and 3–4 cm broad, shiny dark green above (hence the specific epithet “humile”), pale yellowish-green beneath.

The flowers have a strong jasmine scent and are in branched clusters at the ends of branches. They are followed by white or yellow fruits, in late summer and autumn. This plant can be easily propagated from semi-ripe cuttings in early summer, and from green cuttings after the end of summer.

It also sets seed, but the resulting plants may not be true to type. The best time for transplanting is mid-summer. If grown against a south-facing wall, it will tolerate some shade. In light shade, it will flower less profusely than in full sun, but these flowers are larger and have a stronger fragrance.

Jasminum mesnyi (Mesny’s jasmine)

Jasminum mesnyi (Mesny's jasmine)

Mesny’s jasmine is a species of flowering plant in the olive family Oleaceae, native to China. It is an evergreen shrub growing to 2–5 m tall and wide, with simple leaves 1-3 cm long and 1–2.5 cm broad.

The flowers are white or pale pink, produced in clusters of 10-15 at the ends of branches; they are followed by decorative red fruits. This plant can be easily propagated from semi-ripe cuttings in early summer, and from green cuttings after the end of summer.

It also sets seed, but the resulting plants may not be true to type. The best time for transplanting is mid-summer. If grown against a south-facing wall, it will tolerate some shade. In light shade, it will flower less profusely than in full sun, but these flowers are larger and have a stronger fragrance.

Hedychium coronarium  (ginger-scented blue lily)

This species of ginger lily is a rhizomatous perennial, growing to 0.5–1 m tall. The sheathing leaves are sword-shaped, 40–85 cm long and 3–8 cm broad at the widest point, with a raised midrib.

The flowers are strongly scented and range in color from dark red to orange-red, and yellow. These flowers are followed by decorative blue fruits. This plant can be easily propagated from semi-ripe cuttings in early summer, and from green cuttings after the end of summer.

It will also set seed, but the resulting plants may not be true to type. The best time for transplanting is mid-summer. If grown against a south-facing wall, it will tolerate some shade. In light shade, it will flower less profusely than in full sun, but these flowers are larger and have a stronger fragrance.

FAQs

– How many types of Jasmine Flowers is there?

There are different types of Jasmine flowers. Each and every species of jasmine flowers have a different scent. Jasmines vary in size, form, shape and also the purpose they serve.

– What is the characteristics of the Jasmine Flowers plant?

It grows well with full sunlight, partial shade and also in heavy soil. It has three seasons flowering especially during spring and winter. The fragrance would attract people around it where they can admire its flowers colors for instance that could be white, yellow, red and many more.

– What are the Jasmine Flowers uses?

The flowers can be used for aromatherapy. It is also used for wedding decorations, flower arranging and home fragrance.  It has medicinal uses such as for skin illnesses, headache and many more.

Conclusion

In this article, you learned about 12 different types of Jasmine Flowers. You also learned the characteristics of these flowers and what they are used for. If you’re looking to grow or purchase a type of Jasmine flower plant, we hope that our guide has been helpful in your decision-making process!

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